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Q - Topicals

QSL Card

QSL - This series of three initials comes from an old British radiotelegraph code. Q stands for question and when coupled with SL it states “I confirm receipt of your transmission.” Years ago amateur (ham) radio stations and shortwave broadcasters had no way of knowing how far their signals were being transmitted. A system was set up so when a station received another broadcasters signal they would mail a QSL card back to them noting date, time, and frequency. The first known QSL card was mailed in 1916. Though stock cards were being published with three years, many stations began publishing their own unique cards. Some purchased quantities if other publishers cards and overprinted their own information onto them. Today most reception verifications are made through the Internet.



Postcard

Quakers - Quakers made up a substantial number of the early settlers that came to America. They built meetinghouses in all their communities many of which still stand today. These simple historic buildings were often captured on postcards but sparse labeling on these cards sometimes leaves doubt to their true identity. Cards depicting Quaker life are rare but they do show up, especially on moderen photochromes.



Postcard

Quarries - Quarries are nearly as old as mankind, they were flourishing in number durring the years postcards became popular. The sudden growth of cities with their large municipal and office buildings created a huge demand for marble and granite. Many postcards were created depicting all aspects of this industry. By the 1930’s however many quarries had closed as expensive stone was replaced by concrete and steel. Entire communitees revolving around stone cutting have since disappeared.




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