METROPOLITAN POSTCARD CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY PUBLISHERS W
> Publishers   Home   History   Glossary   Guides   Artists   Topicals   Collecting   Blog   Calendar   Contact

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ?



W - PUBLISHERS


Postcard

Waldheim-Eborle AG   (1880’s-)
Vienna, Austria

An early publisher of books and posters. They produced artist signed postcards in tinted line block, many with elaborate printed backs. In 1935 they were forced to relinquish the business to National Socialist Control.



Postcard

Everett Waddey Printing & Stationery Co.   (1890-1936)
Richmond, VA

A printer of books and postcards. Many cards were printed in black & white rotogravure under the label Copper Plate Etching. They are best known for a series of cards depicting historic buildings from Williamsburg, Virginia.



Postcard

Waldrop Photographic Co.   (1903-)
San Juan, PR

This photo studio created souvenir books and postcards from their photographs. Their first cards contracted with the Detroit Publishing Company seem to have made their appearance around 1903, with some having their logo blind embossed on them. They continued to publish sets of views and types that were manufactured by a number of different printers as both real photo cards and in printed form. The same images from earlier series were often reproduced later in other techniques. Their cards were oriented toward an American audience as the titles and backs were printed in English.



Postcard
Logo

John Walker & Co., Ltd.   (1903-1910)
London, England

Publishers of a wide range of postcard types including view-cards, military regiments, cricket players, comic cards by Gordon Browne, political cartoons by Harry Furniss, and other artist signed cards. A large number of monotone views were issued under the Bells Series name. Their most notable set was the Geographical Series displaying a finely drawn map with a pictorial insert that was printed for them by the engravers J. Bartholomew & Co.



Postcard

Wall, Nichols & Co.   (1898-1912)
Honolulu, HI

Publisher of lithographic materials from sheet music to playing cards in a fine halftone. The company began printing monochrome souvenir cards on tinted paper in 1898 directly aimed at the many soldiers and sailors passing through the Hawaiian Territories during the Spanish American War. These cards are referred to as the Boys in Blue series. Their cards were printed by the Art Litho Company in association with Edward H. Mitchell. It is also suspected that some early cards were printed by the Detroit Publishing Company.



Postcard

J.J. Ward   (1902-1947)
Swanswell Street, Coventry, England

John Joseph Ward was photographer and naturalist. As the son of a printer he began his career as an apprentice to the lithography shop of Illiffe & Son, but in 1902 he became interested in photography. Between 1903 and 1913 he published five illustrated books on natural history. Many of the views he captured around Coventry were published as postcards in duotone collotype under the Popular Sepia-Gloss and Sepia Photo Art Series names. Ward was one of the founders of the Coventry Natural History Society, and they now hold over 4,000 of his negatives and slides.



Postcard

F.W. Warne & Co., Ltd.   1865-1983
London, England and New York, NY

An important publisher of children’s books who began turning out many famous titles by the turn of the 20th century. In 1914 they produced a set of 48 postcards reproducing the 19th century nursery rhyme illustrations of Randolph Caldescott. This set was reprinted in 1933 and again in 1975. The company was sold to Penguin Books in 1983.



Postcard

Warwick Brothers & Rutter Ltd.   (1848-1933)
King Street, Toronto, ON Canada

Publishers, printers, and bookbinders. They became the official printers for the Provincial Government of Ontario. They were one of the first to print postcards in Canada producing over 4,000 tinted halftone view-cards in line block with a dull pallet. Many of their card sets also have very decorative borders and some with crests. Their business was destroyed by fire in 1904 but they rebuilt and continued publishing.



Postcard

Washington News Co.   (1909-)
313 6th St. NW, Washington, DC

Publisher and distributor of regional view-cards for the American News Company.



Postcard

Washington Souveir Co.   (1900-1902)
Washington, DC

Published a number of private mailing card sets depicting famous sites around Washington. These cards were printed in a black & white halftone though color was used in the American flags that were part of a small vignetted image placed on each cards front.



Postcard

Wassermann & Schaublin   (1894-1930)
Basil, Switzerland

This printer produced fine posters and postcards through chromolithography and collotype.



Postcard

Waterlow & Sons   1810-1961
London, England

Founded by James Waterlow in 1810, this high quality printing firm was producing engraved stamps, certificates, and banknotes by mid-century. They went on to print many other fine lithographic items such as posters, especially for the London subway, and postcards for institutions such as the British Museum. In 1877 there was a family dispute that lead to the formation of a second company, Waterlow Brothers, but by 1920 they had merged back into Waterlow and Sons, Ltd. This company printed the banknotes for Alves des Reis in the infamous Banco de Portugal fraud of 1925. Waterlow was sold to De la Rue in 1961.



Postcard
Logo

George Elton Watson   (1956-)
Long Beach, CA

A photographer who published linen and photochrome cards of local views, missions, and roadside subjects. His postcards were distributed through Golden West.



Postcard
Logo

Weenenk & Snel   (1908-1958)
The Hague, Netherlands

Publishers of a variety of postcards types including chromolithographic artist signed cards, sepia and black & white view-cards of Holland and the Dutch East Indies, and real photo postcards of movie stars. They also produced a set of postcards on the 1928 Olympics in Amsterdam.

Postcard

W.R. Weenenk, possibly a photographer, previously published monotone and black & white drawn view-cards under his own name only since at least 1900.



Postcard

Wehrli, AG & Co.   1904-1924
Kilchberg, Zurich Switzerland

Originally formed in the mid-1890’s as Gebruder Wehrli but the three brothers, Arthur, Bruno, and Harry merged with Bachmann of Lucerne in 1904 to become Wehrli AG & Company. They published postcards in high quality photo-chromolithography and as real photo cards. By 1920 Orell Fussli of Photoglob was a major shareholder in this company, and the two firms eventually merged in 1924.



Postcard

Charles Weidner   1903-1940
San Francisco, CA

Wiedner had been a commercial photographer since the 1890’s. He first entered the postcard business with the investor William Goeggel in 1903. Together they published 111 numbered cards as Goeggel & Weidner, but by 1904 Weidner was issuing cards under his name alone. Because of reprints cards with the same images can be found under both names. Weidner became an important publisher producing almost 700 postcards in a wide variety of methods including tinted halftones under the trade name Auto-Chrome. There are also Wiedner cards in tinted collotype that were printed in Germany by Louis Glazer, and their set of Panama-Pacific Expo cards were printed by the Albertype Company. Cyanotypes and real photo postcards were also produced. With the exception of a few black & white cards, his postcard publishing ended during World War One with the closing of the German print houses. Weidner continued to work as a staff photographer for newspapers and magazines.



Postcard

Weiler Publishing Co.   (1907-1916)
Dunkirk, NY

A publisher and distributor of German made postcards. Most of their cards depicted local scenes.



Postcard
Logo

William Weiss & Co.   (1910)
Hamilton, Bermuda

A photographer who provided pictures for tourist books and view-cards of Bermuda. His cards were printed as tinted halftones in Germany.



Postcard

Joseph Welch & Sons   (1903-1918)
Mile End, Portsmouth, England

A publisher of view-cards, with many under the name Trichromatic P. C. These Belgian made cards were printed in monotone and tinted collotype. There is little blending of colors and their distinctness gives these cards the appearance of being hand colored. They also produced real photo postcards. While they published foreign views and scenes of southern England, many of their cards were issued in sets that included cats and dogs, romance, the language of flowers, proverbs, playing cards, and the life of Charles Dickens. Their cards are typically only labeled JWS or JW&S.



Postcard

Thomas Wendisch   (1895-1900)
Berlin, Germany

A publisher of site specific and generic Gruss aus cards in chromolithography.



Postcard

Stacy H. Wentworth   (1920’s)
Chatham, MA

Published exceptional view-cards of the Chatham area of Cape Cod in black & white and hand colored collotype.



Postcard

Carl Werner   (1931-1946)
Reichenbach in Vogtland, Saxony

A publishing house and printer of fine lithographic images issued in portfolios and as postcards. They used the work of well known artists such as the images of children from the photographer Lotte Herrlich, and military scenes from the war correspondent Hans Liska. During the Second World War they published many propaganda cards in offset lithography. Many of these postcards were sent to Portugal and Spain for distribution with captions in the language of the intended audience.



Wesco Co.

(see Mike Robers Studio)



Postcard

Wessel   (1940’s)
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

A photographer that published real photo postcards. His views were hand colored in a simple but lively style that was more mannered than realistic.



Postcard
Logo

E.D. West   (1916-1953)
South Yarmouth, MA

An important publisher of view-cards depicting New England scenes, especially of Cape Cod. He contracted out orders with a number of different printers. Many of his cards were hand colored.



Postcard

Western News Co.   1866-
Chicago, IL

John R. Walsh and Andrew McNally chose Chicago to form this publishing and distribution firm because of its strategic position as a transportation hub. Though founded to rival the American News Company, they often worked together as a network in the distribution of printed material that eventually included postcards.



Postcard

Western Publishing & Novelty    (1932-1970’s)
Los Angeles, CA

A publisher and distributer of California related tourist materials and postcards.



Postcard

Wezel & Naumann   1872-1956
Leipzig, Bavaria

An early printer and publisher of fine chromolithographic products including holiday cards, playing cards and calendars. They went on to produce many artist drawn postcards in a vast range of styles. For most of their existance they were best known for their advertising posters. This was a technically innovative company playing an important role in developing the use of artificial stones and zinc plates in lithography, as well at patenting a version of the photochrom process. They opened a London office in the mid-1880’s.

Postcard

While some of their postcards have a very painterly quality they produced a large set of artist signed military cards during the First World War characterized by heavy outlines, which gives them a cartoonish look. They were issued in both black & white and in color. While they appear to be hand colored they are actually facsimile watercolors printed in color lithography. Many have maps with narratives printed on their backs to provide war news.



Postcard
Logo

C.E. Wheelock Co.   (1905-1909)
Peoria, IL

A publisher of black & white, hand colored, and tinted collotype view-cards of the American East. The company name usually appears within the stamp box.



Colored Real Photo Postcard

J.D. White, Ltd.   (1913-1965)
Dundee, Scotland

A publisher of view-cards in a variety of techniques, many under the name Best of All Series. Many cards were printed in black & white, sepia, and tinted halftone line block. Some of their cards were made with Tartan borders. They also published many real photo postcards. While most of these were sepia toned, they were also hand coloring their photo cards into the 1960’s.



Postcard

White City Art Co.   (1893-1909)
611 Manhattan Building, Chicago, IL

Founded to supply souvenirs to the 1893 Chicago Columbian Exposition, they continued to publish prints, illustrated souvenir books, and postcards in the years that followed. While many of these images were of views some cards also depicted women or ethnic types. There best known images are the reproductions of photographs taken by William H. Jackson, who went on to help found the Detroit Publishing Company. Many of their postcards were printed by R.R. Donnelley & Sons.



Postcard

White Star Line   1863-1933
Liverpool, England

White Star was the popular name used for the steamships of the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company. In 1902 the were purchased by the International Mercantile Marine Company in the United States, which kept the recognizable White Star name. Unlike other luxury lines they had three classes for passengers aboard their ships catering to the poor immigrant as well as the wealthy. They published a number of fine chromolithographic postcards for their passengers that also served to advertise their ships. Their most famous liner was the Titanic, and their cards of her are now the most desired. In 1933 they merged into the Cunard Line.



Postcard

Whitney Valentine Co.   1858-1942
218 Main Street, Worcester, MA

Originally a stationary store founded by Sumner Whitney where hand made valentines were sold. When Sumner died in 1861 his brother Edward took over the business and George C. Whitney joined in 1863. By 1888, after buying out most of their competition they became an important publisher of holiday cards made with their own specialty papers. Whitney had put in embossing and paper lace making machinery in his factory so he could manufacture all card components within the United States. As postcards came into vogue they began to produce them as well to become an important publisher of postcard greetings. Many mechanical cards were also manufactured at this time. A fire completely destroyed their business in 1910. Though George rebuilt he died three years later and the firm was taken over by his son Warren. By this time they had additional offices in Boston, New York, and Chicago. As costs rose in the 1930’s they began mass producing cards on plain paper. In 1942 when the Second World War made it impossible to acquire enough paper the company was forced to close. Their cards say Whitney Made or carry a red W.



Postcard

B.K. Wiener   (1910-1913)
Vienna, Austria

A publisher of artist drawn postcards printed through the tricolor process. They seem to have produced many glamour cards but they are best know for their multi baby series.



Postcard
Logo

Wiener Werkstätte   1903-1932
Vienna, Austria

Founded in 1903 by Josef Hoffmann and Koloman Moser as the Viennese Workshop and Production Cooperative of Art Works in Vienna. Within two years this artist cooperative had grown to over 100 members that in addition to creating many fine crafted objects, they designed, published, and printed over a thousand oftheir own postcards. Their cards were all numbered but not all of the names of the artists who designed them were recorded. These postcards have a simple yet very distinct style that can still vary considerably depending on the artist who designed it. Notables such as Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka, and Egon Schiele were all members. Because their products were designed for a more exclusive audience their cards fetched higher than average prices. But as their work grew more organic over the years its popularity lessened in the face of newer geometric styles.



Postcard
Logo

Wildt & Kray   (1903-1915)
15 Lensden Place, London, England

A publisher of a wide variety of postcard types. These included many view-cards that were artist drawn. Those from Ireland sometimes had shamrock borders. They also produced many real photo cards, sepia art reproductions, greeting cards, depictions of dogs, and people in the form of vegetables. These cards were manufactured in England. Reinthal & Newman printed many cards with them.



Real Photo Postcard

Thaddeus Wilkerson   1909-1916
522 W 145th Street, New York, NY

A Photographer who captured many views and scenes of New York street life, though mostly of uptown Manhattan. He published over 400 images as real photo postcards and some as black & white collotypes. While many of his photos are quite ordinary he recorded many unusual scenes. He is also known to have produced real photo postcards from his travels to India.



Real Phoro Postcard

Stephen H. Willard   (1914-1965)
Palm Springs, CA

An artist who produced many paintings and photographs of Western scenery, especially desert views. Willard latter published many of these same images as linen postcards, printed by Curt Teich.



Postcard

S. Willens & Co., Inc.    (1912-1975)
Chicago, IL and Detroit, MI

From their offices on Chicago’s Dearborn Street, this firm primarily did typesetting work for advertisers. They were first known for their matchbook covers, but they later began to publish novelties and roadside postcards. George Willen opened a second typesetting company in Detroit in 1916 that worked on ads for newspapers and magazines. He is however best known for filming the burning of the zeppelin Hindenburg near Lakehurst, NJ in 1937. His son Harvey took over the firm and merged it with Michigan Typesetting in 1975 to become Willens Michigan Co., which continues to operate out of Bloomfield, MI.



Postcard
Logo

Williamson-Haffner Engraving Co.   (1905-1910)
Denver, Co

A publisher of lithographic souvenir books and view-cards of the American West. While their views were largely based on photographic reproduction, many scenes were artist drawn. They also produced comic postcards.



Real Phoro Postcard

A.D. Willis & Co.   (1883-1905)
Warganvi, New Zealand

Archibald Dudingston Willis was printer publisher of books, maps, prints, playing cards, and an early pioneer in in the production of Christmas and New Years cards. These chromolithographic holiday cards were carried over into the postcard format in the late 1890’s along with a number of view-cards in the gruss aus style. Their cards have a very bright pallet and elaborate montage design work on both fronts and backs. Willis may have also reproduced the work of local painters.



Real Phoro Postcard

T. Willmett & Sons, Pty, Ltd   1870-1980
Townsville, Australia

Thankfull Willmett was not only a bookseller, stationer, and printer, he was partners in the North Queensland Newspaper Company and served as Mayor of Townsville for four terms. The business published a number of view-cards depicting local scenes in tinted halftone that appear as if they were hand colored Some of these cards a a very high gloss finish.



Postcard

Albert M. Wilson   (1908-1914)
Buffalo, NY

A publisher of a variety of postcard types including holiday cards and view-cards of regional scenes and Palestine.



Postcard
Logo

G.W. Wilson & Co., Ltd.   1852-1908
2 St. Swithin Street, Aberdeen, Scotland

George Washington Wilson began his career as a portrait photographer but gradually moved over to landscapes traveling all over Scotland in search of views. When he died in 1893 his studio was one of the largest publishers of photographs in the world. The company went on to publish many of these images as postcards in tinted collotype with an extra blue plate until the firm was liquidated in 1908. Tens of thousands of negatives had been produce and many were purchased by former employees such as Fred Hardie who used them to publish cards until 1920.



Postcard

H.W. Wilson Co.   (1900-1947)
Minneapolis, MN

A publisher of periodical indexes and literature reference books. In their early years they also published a number of local view-cards in tinted halftone.



Postcard

Wilson & Co.   (1910)
Orchard Road, Singapore, Straits Settlements

Photographers who created cabinet cards and published printed postcards depicting views and types of Maylay. These cards were produced in black & white, monotone, and tinted collotypes.



Postcard

Henry Winkleman   1892-1928
Auckland, New Zealand

Winkleman arrived in New Zealand in 1878. By 1892 he had taken up photography but continued to supplement his income with other work until opening a studio in 1901 in Victoria Arcade. He shot views all over the country but concentrated on maritime scenes. These images were published in photo-chromolithographed and as real photo postcards. Winkleman retired in 1928 and sold all his negatives to the Auckland Public Library.



Postcard

Winkler & Voigt   (1896-1900)
Leipzig, Saxony

Early publishers of chromolithographic postcards specializing in Gruss aus and anonymous greetings.



Postcard

John O. Winsch   1910-1915
Stapleton, NY

A very important publisher of artist signed and holiday cards. They are especially known for their Halloween and Thanksgiving cards. Winsch used European artists to work directly with his German printer. (most likely Obpacher Bros.). Samuel L. Schmucker was one of their better known artists who created the Winsch Girl. Fred Kolb, Katherine Eilliot, Charles Levi, and James Frexas also created cards for them. They produced almost 4,000 different designs, many of which were issued in sets. Though most of their cards were manufactured in Germany, some were printed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Many of their cards do not carry the firms name, though they all have a similar graphic design on their backs. Other publishers however took advantage of this and began using a similar back hoping to mislead customers and capitalize on the higher prices that Winsch cards fetched. Winsch was the co-manager of the Art Lithographic Publishing Company in 1915, but his exact tenure is uncertain. He seems to have resumed publishing postcards under his own name sometime after the end of World War One until about 1925.



Real Photo Postcard

Winter & Pond   1893-1945
Juneau, AK

Photographers Lloyd Valentine Winter and Edwin Percy Pond ran a photo shop together. They produced real photo postcards of native peoples and local scenery. Some of their photo images were also used to make printed cards.



Postcard

Witten-Dennison Post Card Co.   (1907-1913)
Maine

A publisher of view-cards and greeting cards. They moved to Auburn, IN in 1910 and changed their name in 1913 to the Auburn Post Card Mfg. Company. By 1929 they changed their name once again to the Auburn Greeting Card Company. In 1933 they were bought out by the D.E. Messenger Corp.



Postcard

Wittemann Brothers   1885-1902
Spring Street, Brooklyn, NY

The photographer Adolph Wittemann along with his brother Herman had been publishing souvenir albums since 1867. In 1885 they formalized this arrangement by forming the the firm Witteman Brothers. Their photographs reproduced as collotypes were printed by Louis Glaser. In 1890 they formed the Albertype Company and began printing their own material, but cards printed through the private mailing card era continued to carry the A. Wittemann name.



Postcard

Witte’s Wonder Water Colors   (1909-1914)
1213 Race Street, Philadelphia, PA

C.W. Witte manufactured and sold watercolor painting kits for the hand coloring of photographs, maps, and postcards. Long strips of paper were saturated with a variety of hues that were then bound into a booklet and sold with a brush. Pieces of this paper could be cut off and placed in water for transparent washes or a wet brush could be run directly over the paper to pick up more opaque color. He also marketed black & white postcards with a note on their backs stating that they should only be tinted with Witte’s Wonder Water Colors. Witte traveled extensively demonstrating his product in stores.



Postcard
Logo

H.L. Woehler    (1905-1913)
Buffalo, NY and Dresden, Saxony

A publisher and printer of regional views and holiday cards in tinted collotype. These cards were printed in Germany.



Postcard
Logo

Wolf Co.   1879-1931
619 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA

This firm was founded by the brothers Edward, Isaac, and Gustave Wolf in 1879. They became leading importer, publisher, and manufacturer of art novelties in the United States. They were also well known for their advertising work in chromolithography as well as fancy embossing. They eventually established a branch in Berlin to do much of their lithographic printing. They became a large publisher of holiday and greeting cards, but in 1895 they and the Art Lithographic Publishing Co. founded the International Art Publishing Co. as a subsidiary to take over their postcard production.. Ellen H. Clapsaddle, who had been contributing work to their subsidiary, was hired by Wolf & Co. in 1906 as a full time illustrator.



Postcard
Logo

J.E. Wolfensberger   (1902-)
Zurich, Switzerland

A fine arts publisher known for their high quality stone lithographic printing. They produced prints and posters for many famous artists as well as artist signed postcards.



Postcard

Wolfrum & Hauptmann   (1898-1902)
Nuremberg, Bavaria

A printer and publisher of chromolithographic postcards.



Postcard

Woodgifts   (1940-1948)
Columbus, KS

A small publisher of linen postcards depicting local views and sites to interest tourists. The texture of their linen cards was notably high.



Real Photo Postcard

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co.   (1882-1928)
St. Louis, MO

A printer of various products including maps, tickets, labels, and railroad timetables. They went on to print a number of simple private mailing cards in halftone lineblock with an RYB pallet.



Real Photo Postcard

Jesse Sumner Wooley   1902-1943
Ballston Spa, NY

A photographer of regional views. He published and sold real photo postcards from his store. He also turned many of his photographic images into color lithographic cards. Wooley became the official photographer of the Silver Bay Association and created many postcards for them.



Postcard
Logo

Woolstone Brothers   1902-1933
London, England

A large publisher of many different card types in many different techniques. Some of their trade names included Artlettes, Bromettes that were used for postcard bookmarks, Bromides, Chromolettes, Glazettes, Glossettes of actresses, Photolettes, and Sellwells. Many of their subjects included artist signed cards, comic cards by Fred Buchanan, a naval series including one on the life of Admiral Nelson, real photo and printed view-cards, cut out novelties, and a vast amount of holiday and greeting cards. Many of these cards either cary the words The Milton Post Card or Milton Series.



Postcard
Logo

F. W. Woolworth Co.   1878-1997
New York, NY

Frank Winfield Woolworth opened his first retail store in Utica, NY in 1878. He became a publisher and major retailer of postcards in 1912. These cards were sold from the company’s ever expanding chain of Five & Dime stores both in America and abroad. They had designed and published many of their own Christmas cards since 1879. As other publishers were forced to compete with their bargin prices the quality of postcards was forced downward. Many publishers blamed Woolworth for destroying the postcard craze by dumping cards on the market at prices set below profit margin.



Postcard

Charles Worcester & Co., Ltd.   (1904-)
5 Kingsdown Parade, Bristol, England

A publisher of postcards issued under the Chic Series name. This included views presented as line drawings in a sepia monotone, as well as dramatic and dreamy real photo cards of pale moonlit scenes. Many of these mountain views by the artist Elmer Keene were hand colored.



Postcard

World Peace Posters   1931-1932
31 Union Square, New York, NY

Dedicated to exposing the artificial glories of war and actively lobbying for a more peaceful approach to international politics, this controversial organization published posters and postcards to help get their message out. Inspired by Bruce Barton, they decided to publicize their cause through more advanced technologies and changed their name to New World Peaceways, Inc. in 1932.



Postcard

World Post Card Co.   1903-1916
Philadelphia, PA

A publisher and printer of black & white and tinted halftone view-cards in line block. The company was founded by J. Murray Jordan who also produced postcards under his own name.



Postcard
Logo

Wright, Barrett & Stillwell Co.   (1887-1921)
University Avenue, St. Paul, MN

This wholesale paper house produced hand colored regional view-cards for a number of small publishers. Their name was printed within the stamp box of their cards.



W.R. & S.

See William Ritchie & Sons, Ltd.



Postcard

Wydawnictwo Salonu Malarzy Polska   (1906-1939)
Krakow, Poland

This Salon of Polish painters published a variety of postcard types. View-cards were issued in both fine monotone collotype as well as through tricolor printining. They also published real photo postcards of nudes. Many military and propaganda cards were produced during the First World War and the Civil War that followed. Poland was part of the Russian Empire during some of these years.



Postcard
Logo

Evelyn Wrench   1900-1906
London, England

Publisher of a great variety of picture postcards in varying techniques. They produced tricolor printed series on famous houses, sports players, literary characters from Dickens, scenes from plays, ships and trains, pictures from Punch magazine, art reproductions, comic cards, and greetings, all printed in England. They also published many views-cards in color, sepia, and a black & white series depicting resorts on a cream paper printed in Saxony. Wrench became a Limited company in 1902 and in 1904 they changed there name to Wrench Postcards Ltd. Because they refused to distribute any postcards but their own, supply eventually outgrew demand and they were out of business within two years. Wrench went on to have a career with the Daily Mail.



Postcard

Henry S. Wyer   1880-1920
Federal Street, Nantucket, MA

This native of Nantucket was an artist, writer and photographer. In 1880 he opened a photo studio in Yonkers, New York but continually returned to the Island to do occasional photo work. By 1886 the call grew too strong and he returned to Nantucket for good where he opened the Wyer Art Store. Eventually a second store was opened in Siasconset. Wyer published many of Nantucket’s earliest postcards printed in black & white, pale monochrome, and tinted halftone. His early halftone cards are often soft in appearance due to the very open halftone screen used, while most of his later cards were printed as sharp monochrome collotypes.




Back  UP  Next