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Postcard

Taber Prang Art Co.   1898-1937
Springfield, MA

Formed when Louis Prang sold out the interests in his lithographic firm to the Taber Art Company, then operating out of New Bedford, MA. They started printing view-cards of Boston and holiday cards in 1898.



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Tacoma Eastern Railroad   1890-1918
Tacoma, WA

This railroad that primarily transported coal and lumber had a history of slow expansion. In 1904 with the founding of Mount Rainier National Park their business greatly grew with the influx of tourists. They not only provided the only rail passenger service to the Park but supplemental transportation to its inns. At this time they began publishing postcards, many with unusual pictorial backs to promote their services. For many years this company ran under the shadow of the Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railroad, and by 1918 it was merged into the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad.



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M.W. Taggart   (1905-1910)
New York, NY

A large publisher of greeting and holiday postcards many of which had humorous or patriotic themes. Seaside cards and those depicting Blacks were also common. Many of their postcards were embossed.



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H.H. Tammen Curio Co.   1896-1953
1516 Arapahoe Street, Denver, CO

A novelty dealer and important publisher of national view-cards and Western themes in photo-chromolithography. Their logo does not appear on all their cards but other graphic elements often remain the same.



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Tanner Brothers, Ltd.   1906-1925
Wellington, New Zealand

Photographers who published photo books and black & white and glossy postcards in tinted halftone of views and Types from their work. They are noted for their Maoriland Series. Their cards were printed in Saxony.



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K.S. Tanner, Jr.   (1945-1957)
Rutherfordtown, NC

An importer and distributor of postcards for the Atelier Graphique H. Vontobel in Switzerland. These view-cards depict scenes on a national scope mostly contracted for resorts and tourist attractions. A notable set was made of the colonial architecture in Williamsburg, Virginia. These cards may bare either the name of Runta, Vontobel, or K.S. Tanner, Jr. who was most likely the owner of the Runta Import Co. All cards were printed in color gravure and have white borders with an irregular edge. The Tanner cards are labeled with a very cursive font.



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Tanner Souvenir   (1905-1910)
50 & 52 Howard, New York, NY

This firm founded by Walter S. Tanner manufactured souvenirs and published monochrome view-cards and many different types of novelty cards.



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Dimitri Tarazi & Sons   1862-1931
Beirut, Lebanon

This firm began by opening a gallery in Beirut selling art and antiquities, and then went on to produce crafted objects and furniture in oriental design. There popularity allowed them to expand into Damascus, and then Jerusalem, Cairo, and Alexandria. They would also expand into producing postcards depicting scenes in the Ottoman Empire. After 1931 they closed and reopened a number of times under different names. They now operate in Beirut as Michael E. Tarazi & Sons.



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Alfred John Tattersall   1886-1951
American Samoa

Tattersall was a photographer who left New Zealand for Samoa in 1886. After his arrival he became an assistant to fellow New Zealand photographer John Davis who had come to Samoa thirteen years earlier. Tattersall captured many images of views and types and when Davis died he continued printing his negatives. About 1905 these photographic images began being published as postcards. They were printed in a variety of manner in both Samoa and in Germany.



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Taylor Art Co.   (1907-1909)
Philadelphia, PA

A publisher of holiday, comic, and local view-cards. It is unknown if they had any relationship to the Helman-Taylor Art Co. of New York, who produced many illustrated prints for schools and libraries.



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A & G Taylor   (1860’s-1918)
London, England

Photographers Andrew and George Taylor set up the Royal Studio in the 1860’s, and as they became a major producer of cartes de visite they began opening up branches in many other towns and cities including some in the United States. They were publishing postcards by 1901 under the names of four different series though there are some unmarked cards. The Reality Series consisted of greetings, children, actresses, and military themes produced as real photo postcards. The Carbontone Series were black & white printed views and greetings. The Orthochrome Series were also of views and greetings but printed in tinted halftone. They also published a Comic Series. After 1914 they moved their primary studio to Hastings. Their cards were printed in both Saxony and Great Britain.



Real Photo Postcard

G. Morris Taylor   (1925-1960’s)
Jasper, AB Canada

A photographer of western Canadian scenes, most notably of the Rocky Mountains. Many of his images were turned into real photo postcards that were manufactured in Canada. In later years his photographs were use to make photochromes under the trade name Taylorchrome.



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Taylor, Platt & Co.   (1906-1916)
1161 Broadway, New York, NY

Published a wide variety of postcard types in series from national views, greetings. and artist signed to cards of Blacks and novelties. Their cards were produced in sepia and tinted halftone.



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Curt Teich Co.   1898-1978
Chicago, IL

Curt Teich was already working as a lithographer in Lobenstein, Germany when he emigrated to Chicago in 1895. He would start his own firm in 1898 concentrating on newspaper and magazine printing. While he was an early publisher of postcards, he did not begin printing them in number himself until 1908. As his competition dwindled his sales expanded, and his American factories would eventually turn out more postcards than any other in the United States. They they are best known for their wide range of advertising and view-cards of North America. By the 1920Ôs they were producing so many postcards with borders that they became recognized as a type dubbed White Border Cards. Curt Teich was an early pioneer of the offset printing process having started using offset presses in 1907. It would take a number of years before he had presses made to his satisfaction, and many more years for him to perfect the method. His inovations in this printing technique directly led to the production of what we now call Linens by the early 1930’s. While they produced many cards during World War Two, they also aided the war effort by printing many military maps. Although Curt Teich eventually turned management of the firm over to his son, he remained active in company operations throughout its history. After his death in 1974 the family business was sold to Regensteiner Publishers who continued to print cards at the Chicago plant until 1978. Afterwards the rights to the company name and processes were sold to the Irish firm John Hinde Ltd. Their California subsidiary now prints cards under the name John Hinde Curteich, Inc.

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1900-1908 Cards numbered 1 to 14989. While the Curt Teich Company is largely known for manufacturing postcards in the United States, a number of their earliest cards in the form of tinted collotypes were contracted out through German printers. They have no letter prefixes or fancy names, just the Curt Teich Company name and logo.


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In addition to publishing German printed cards, they produced some tinted halftone cards in Chicago.


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1908-1928 Cards numbered A or R 1 to 124180. These tinted halftone cards represent Teich’s first serious effort to enter the postcard publishing business. Those with an R prefix were generally printed as bleeds issued under the C.T. Photochrome name.

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Those of the same period with an A prefix were issued with with white borders under the C.T. American Art name.

It is important to note that the numbering system in combination with prefixes is what designates the year issued and the printing method. The trade names on their cards do not nessesarily carry any specificity. While most C.T. American Art cards were produced as tinted halftones within the A series; they were also produced in offset lithography in the OC series and latter as linens in the H series.


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1912-1925 Cards numbered 1 to 14804 with a two letter prefix. While the production of C.T. American Art cards dominated these years, they also published a wide variety of card types in various printing methods and styles alongside their more common cards. Some known series are AD, AP, AQ, AS, AX, DT, OR, RA, RD, RH, RP, RS, and WP.


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AQ   These tinted halftone cards issued under the name C.T. Aquarelle were made to imitated the look of hand coloring.


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DT   Curt Teich Duotone. Printed as a black halftone over a solid fawn tint.

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RD   Curt Teich Doubletone. Printed as a black halftone over two tints, one neutral and one warm.

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RA   C.T. Artchrom. Initially issued as tinted halftones for the Panama Pacific International Exposition, this same name continued to be used on other cards including those printed as linens.

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RH   Curt Teich Handcolored. Printed as a black halftone, often with the extensive use of shading mediums, and then hand colored.


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1905-1926 with C prefix Curt Teich also produced uncommon sets of cards with single letter prefixes, often followed by the letter C. Some of these cards were issued under their own trade names. Information on theses sets are scant as they were never properly recorded in the company’s books.


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Curt Teich Sky-tint. Printed in a black halftone with a blue lithographic overprint in the sky. Most seem to have been published in the early 1920’s.


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D   Curt Teich Photo-Varicolor
The color on these cards were produced through shading mediums and overprinted with a black halftone.


1929-1930 Tinted halftone cards printed in this interim period had the last two digits of the year printed after the card number, 1-29 to 6262-29 and 1-30 to 2934-30.


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1929-1978 Cards numbered D1 to D20363. These were largely monochromatic cards ranging from pale grey to bluish green issued with and without borders under the C.T. Photo-Platin name. While some were produced through straight halftone printing, others were produced with shading mediums, which gives them a stylish but stiff appearance. This technique was also used on souvenirs and other promotional materials they printed, which are included within this series numbers.


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After 1930 card numbers began with a number corresponding to the last digit of the year it was published in followed by a letter series denoting the decade. A series cards were printed in the 1930’s, B in the 1940’s, and C in the 1950’s. They were almost all issued with an H prefix designating a linen card under the CT Colortone name. While most of these cards have borders, some were also issued as bleeds.


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A smaller subset of linen cards within the H series was issued under the CT Colorit name. Many of these are advertising cards.


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The same numbering system continued with the last digit of the year followed by D indicating cards printed in the 1960’s and E for cards printed until 1978. These were issued with a K prefix designating them as modern chrome cards issued under the Curteichcolor name. Some of these cards date back into the 1950’s. The quality of these cards runs the gamut since it took some time to perfect the technique. After Regensteiner took over the firm in 1974 all cards were printed as continental sized chromes issued with the prefix ED.


Curt Teich printed postcards for many other publishers both large and small. Sometimes the name of both firms will appear on the card, and sometimes only the contract publisher. Even in these latter cases Teich’s unique numbering system often remains, which clues us in that he was the printer. Other prefixes were also used to designate special cards or those printed for especially large contracts.

Series B, E, K   Miniature postcards.
Series H   Contract cards for Fred Harvey.
Series L   Contract cards for Hugh C. Leighton.
Series N   Used to designate a reprinted image.
Series W   Contract cards for the F.W. Woolworth Company.


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Around 1910 to 1914 a series of national view-cards in tinted halftone were printed under the Sexichrome and Octochrome labels that are different from those issued by the American News Co. The name seems to imply they were printed in six and eight different colors but they all appear to be poorly printed in a more limited pallet with little optical blending. While a large number of different local publishers names can be found on the back of these cards, the name of Curt Teich has also been found. This would seem to imply that Curt Teich was the probable printer of all these cards.



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Temme Co.   (1906-1913)
Orange, NJ

Fred G. Temme published black & white and tinted halftone view-cards depicting scenes from New York and New Jersey. They were made in Germany.



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B.G. Teubner   1811-
Stuttgart, Germany

An important publisher of books that became well known for their Bibliotheca Teubneriana, a set of low priced but quality reprints of ancient and Medieval literature. They began publishing postcards at the turn of the 20th century concentrating on artist signed silhouettes, many of which were printed over solid tints.



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Thacker, Spink & Co.   (1853-1960)
Calcutta, India

A major Indian book publisher of literature, guides, history, and almanacs. They were also an early publisher of picture postcards. They had an office for distribution in London, England.



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Frank S. Thayer Publishing Co.   (1905-1918)
Denver, CO

A publisher of Western view-cards and themes along with cowboy song sets through tricolor printing.



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G. L. Thompson   (1906-1909)
New York, NY

Published line block halftone postcards in black & white depicting the coastal fortifications and heavy guns protecting New York’s waterways.



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Thompson’s Studio   (1901-1912)
Marblehead, MA

Photographer Franklin E.S. Thompson published many early local scenes as monochromatic and tinted collotypes. They were made in Germany.



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Thompson & Thompson   (1908-1926)
Boston, MA

Published view-cards of New England scenes. Most of their halftone lithographic and hand colored cards were printed through Valentine & Sons. They also published many fine cards in tinted collotype that were printed in France with very distinctive hand drawn skies.



Real Photo Postcard

Thwaites   1905-1932
Ketchikan, AK

John E. (Jack) Thwaites was a photographer who came to Alaska in 1905. He spent many years traveling the Territory until settling down in Ketchikan in 1919. He opened a photo shop there in 1925 from which he sold many of his images as real photo postcards. In 1930 he began working with Otto Schallerer on a series of scenic photo books. When Thwaites retired in 1932 he sold his business to Schallerer who ran it until its sale in 1965.



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Tibbutt Photo   1906-1927
Auckland, New Zealand

Photographer Alfred G. Tibbutt, who operated the Victoria Studios in Hamilton, moved to Auckland with his brother Walter in 1906 to open a new studio. From here they produced local portrait and landscape work that they also published as tinted collotype postcards. Their Opalette Series was one of their more unusual though similar to other real photo cards with oval borders manufactured in England on bromide paper.



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Tichenor & Rudolph   (1908-1968)
Middletown, NY

This paper wholesaler and dealer primarily published local view-cards depicting scenes from southern New York to northern New Jersey. Some cards were also produced directly for business correspondence such as will call cards. Their German made cards were manufactured in a variety of techniques. On some cards Edmund L. Tichenor is listed as the publisher but other cards carry nothing more than their logo. They also functioned as a jobber producing postcards for small local publishers.



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Tichnor Brothers, Inc.   (1908-1987)
160 N. Washington Street, Boston and Cambridge, MA

A major publisher and printer of a wide variety of postcards types. Their view-cards were produced on a national level. They also produced a black & white series on the hurricane of 1938 in line block halftone.

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Their photochomes went under the trade name Lusterchrome. They also produced an early Tichnor Gloss series in offset lithography that was so heavily retouched they floated somewhere between being artist drawn and being a photograph. The company was sold in 1987 to Paper Majic.



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W.H. Tipton & Co.   1878-1929
Gettysburg, PA

William Howard Tipton entered the world of photography by apprenticing to the Tyson Brothers when he was only 12 years old. This studio was purchased by Robert Asbury Myers in 1866 and the two soon became partners opening the Tipton & Myers Excelsior Gallery. In 1873 C.J. Tyson came back into the picture and bought out Myers, but Tipton bought out Tyson by 1878. Tipton set up a new studio under his own name in 1880 from which he produced carte de visite and stereo-views in addition to his large format landscape photos. As postcards came into fashion Tipton began publishing his images as tinted collotype postcards. Tipton is considered the foremost photographer of the Gettysburg battlefield.



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A. Tomasia   (1918-1933)
Ajaccio, France

This Corsican photographer turned many of his images of views and types into black & white and color postcards.



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Tomikichiro Tokuriki   1923-1999
Kyoto, Japan

A woodblock artist who produced both prints and postcards. He came came from a long line of artists dating back to the late 16th century,. Tokuriki worked in two distinct styles, sosaku hanga, a contemporary revival of traditional Japanese techniques and designs, and shin hanga, a woodblock style that incorporated modern Western stylistic elements. Most of his images were produced by the large publishers Uchida and Unsodo, though he did publish some postcards under his own name. They usually have writing on the back in English for they were oriented toward an American audience as the shin hanga style never became very popular in Japan.



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Tomboya   (1910-1912)
Yokohama, Japan

Founded by Tokutaro Maeda of Kamigataya Publishing, they produced high quality black & white and tinted collotype view-cards of Japan based on the photos of Takaji Hotta. Their titles were printed in both English and Japanese as they were oriented toward foreign visitors.



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Tomlin Art Co.   (1943-1960’s)
Northport, NY

A publisher of collotype view-cards of Queens County and Long Island, New York. Many of these cards, printed in black & white and monotone had hand coloring added to only selective parts of the image possibly by airbrush. This firm later went on to produce photochromes.



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Topps Chewing Gum, Inc.    1938-
254 36th Street, Brooklyn, New York

This manufacturer of Topps Gum was founded by the four Shorin brothers as a way to revitalize the failing business, American Leaf Tobacco, established by their father in 1890. In 1947 they introduced Bazooka Bubble Gum and in 1950 they began adding it to packs of trading cards to help encourage sales. Two years later they introduced the baseball card as we know it today. These cards quickly gained in popularity to the point they were being purchased for themselves rather than for the gum. While baseball cards grew to dominate the trading cards industry a variety of non sports related cards were produced as well. Despite their smaller size some of these cards were issued as miniature postcards that could be mailed. These cards were printed in the United States and were sold over the counter and through venting machines. Their business name was changed to The Topps Co., Inc. in 1987 and in 1994 they moved their headquarters to Whitehall street in Manhattan.



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Toronto Litho Co., Ltd.   (1878-1909)
King Street, Toronto, Canada

This firm primarily printed chromolithographic posters and prints, but they were also a pioneer of Canadian postcards. Most of their subjects centered around cities, sports, and royalty. After 1909 they were known as Stone Ltd.



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J. Tosovic   (1918-1935)
Raguse, Italy

A photographer that published picture books and regional view-cards in photo-chromolithography. These cards tend to have a more simple grain and heavier retouching than those from other publishers that use this technique.



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Tower Mfg. & Novelty Co.   (1906-1915)
New York, NY

A publisher of black & white view-cards in collotype in addition to various other printed materials. They produced an unusual postcard set on the San Francisco earthquake of 1906. Their cards were printed in Germany.



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Charles A. Townsend   (1914-1931)
Belfast, Maine

A photographer of the mid-Maine coast who published many of his images as real photo postcards. He is well known for his work depicting Acadia National Park. Many of his scenes were published by the Jordan Pond House. The Eastern Illustrating Company would later create many real photo postcards from his negatives without providing photo credit.



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Toyo Kisen Kaisha (Oriental Steamship Co.)   1896-1926
Yokohama, Japan

This steamship company connected a number of ports in Japan with service to San Francisco, Honolulu, and Hong Kong. At the turn of the 20th century they began publishing postcards for their customers. These cards often depicted scenes based on Japanese romantic themes rather than the typical ships of the line or ports of call. Their service was interrupted between 1904 and 1905 when their fleet was put into military use during the Russo-Japanese War. Despite opening new routes to South America in 1906 they faced ever growing competition and were taken over by Nippon Yuson Kaisha in 1926.



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Alberto Traldi   (1902-1918)
Milan, Italy

A publisher of a variety of postcard types in photogravure and lithography. Though they concentrated on view-cards of Europe and the Middle East they also produced a series on dogs and the wild relief sculpture of D. Mastroianni.



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Trautmann & von Seggern   (1918)
Hamburg, Germany

A publisher of black & white and color postcards in tricolor. They seem to have had an affinity with Orientalism, reproducing paintings in this genre and publishing artist signed cards of the Arabian Tales. Some of their cards were issued in larger than standard sizes.



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Dr. Trenkler Co.   1894-1972
Leipzig, Saxony

This fine art printer was first established in 1894 under the name Phototechnisches Institut Dr. Trenlker & Co. by Dr Bruno Trenkler and Carl Gustav Jahrig. After the comings and goings of a few additional partners, the firm settled on the name Dr. Trenkler & Co. by 1900. They would become one of the largest printers and publishers of lithographic and collotype postcards in Germany, producing view-cards from all over the world. They are also known for a large set of cards issued for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. They opened an office in London in 1902 where the publisher Frederick Hartmann became their agent. There growth required the opening of another factory around 1904, and about this time they also took on a new partner, Max Hoffmann. In the following years they got into a long legal battle for using the term Autochrom to describe their tinted lithographs, which was a trade name registered with Louis Glaser. The loss of this case combined with a long labor strike and the failure of Jahrig to form a strong union of collotype printers contributed to their decision in 1909 to sell off the publishing side of their business. All postcard publishing would be taken over by Trinks & Co. and Jahrig would leave the firm the following year. They continued to print postcards but in smaller numbers, and eventually switched techniques to offset lithography and rotogravure.

While no longer publishing, they continued to place their name on the cards they printed such as a set of black & white cards depicting the German front lines during the First World War. The firm was turned into a public company somewhere between 1922 and the death of Dr. Trenkler in 1926. By 1929 it was bankrupt but found itself resurrected the same year as Dr. Trenkler & Co. AG under its former director Gustav Fehre, and with the financial backing of E. Pinkau & Co. It was supposedly supposed to be a book publisher but they seemed to have produced some cards as well. The exact relationship of this new firm with Pinkau unknown, but after J. Pinkau died in 1958 the remnants of both firms were incorporated into VEB Bromsilberdruck by 1972.



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Trinks & Co.   (1907-1954)
Leipzig, Germany

Founded by Ernst Herman Trinks in 1907 as a publishing house for lithographic view-cards as well as real photo postcards. They used Dr. Trenkler & Co. for some of their printing, and in 1909 they bought out the entire postcard publishing side of their business. The fate of this firm is uncertain but they were probably nationalized by the East German government sometime after 1954.



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A. Trub & Cie   1903-
Aarau, Switzerland

SEE Muller & Trub



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Raphael Tuck & Sons   1866-1960’s
London, England and 122 Fifth Ave, New York, NY

This Company was founded in 1866 by Raphael Tuck, a seller of furniture and picture frames. After only a few months in business he expanded to become an important dealer in popular lithographic prints and greeting cards. In 1871, after concentrating on the picture side of the business, Tuck’s three sons joined the firm and they began publishing their first Christmas cards, printed in their native Prussia. When Raphael retired in 1881, his son Adolph took over the family business. He opened offices in New York in 1882 and Paris in 1885 to facilitate orders and distribution. By 1894, a year after they were appointed official printers to Queen Victoria, they printed their first Souvenir Card.

When postal regulations were finally changed after much lobbying by Tuck and others, it provided better opportunities to enter the postcard market. Tuck immediately began the printing of postcards in chromolithography, and their twelve card set of London became the first illustrated card set in England. After opening their new facilities in 1899, Raphael House became the first publisher to print postcards in a larger size that we now call standard. They went on to publish a very wide variety of card types and all sorts of printed matter, including many innovative designs, eventually becoming a major publishing house. Not one to miss an opportunity, Tuck also became a major supplier of postcard accessories such as albums and display frames for cards. While most of Tuck’s cards were printed in Prussia, Saxony, and Holland until the First World War, the designs on them not made at Raphael House usually came from artists local to the subject at hand working through their international branches. After Raphael’s death in 1900 his son Adolph ran the business until his own death in the Great War. The firm was then taken over by his son Reginald. Their London factory and offices were destroyed in 1940 during a German bombing raid, but they began publishing anew after the war. Reginald died in 1954 and the business then passed to his brother Desmond who retired in 1959. Soon after the firm was purchased by Purnell & Sons.


Many problems exist with Tuck’s numbering system, which began in 1898, as it is both sequentially and serially ordered. In addition all cards within a series that was issued in packets carry the same number, and while cards were supposedly issued in series of six some sets have additional cards. The same cards printed for American and British markets often carried different numbers.


Chromolithographic views, often artist signed, were issued as private mailing cards. The first numbered series started in 1898. Three U.S. sets were made in black & white with a heraldic design.
  Washington, DC   3000-3009
  Boston, MA   5010-5019
  Philadelphia, PA   5020-5029


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In 1902 five additional U.S. sets were issued as private mailing cards in color with the artists names printed on them.
  New York, NY   5051-5070
  Atlantic City, NJ   5071-5080
  The Hudson River, NY   5081-5090
  Chicago, IL   6000-6011
  St. Louis, MO   6012-6023


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In 1901 a number of monochrome cards were published in collotype on different types of colored paper. These cards were printed in Saxony.


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Tuck produced a number of early card sets in chromolithography. Their largest were made in 1902 and 1903 issued as the United Kingdom Series containing 53 sets of cards, and the Heraldic Series illustrating major cities and towns of Great Britain printed in monotones with color crests and decorative graphics. These cards were printed in Bavaria.


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A Continental Series of art cards were printed in Germany as Chromolithographs. Many of these paintings and illustration reproductions were borrowed from other European publishers.


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The cards of their lithochrome series (sometimes called photochromes, but not to be confused with chromes), were not individually numbered but sold in packets of six in which all cards carried the same series number (1000-1099 and 2000-2800’s). This was their largest series covering numerous countries and topics. Many of these sets were marketed to specific geographical locations. They were printed in Germany and Saxony.


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The Oilette series, first issued in 1903 depicted painted views and also came in sets. These were Tuck’s most popular cards. In 19005 they began produced many scenes from all over the many colonies of the British Empire in the Wide Wide World series, a name taken from a popular book set. These cards were printed through the tricolor process in England.


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Only a few U.S. views were created as Oilettes and they are mostly of New York City consisting of three large series. The Greater New York (series 1038) and New York (series 2430) cards mostly depicted everyday street life while the Cosmopolitan New York series concentrated on immigrant neighborhoods (the Ghetto 1013, Little Italy 1014, Chinatown 1068). These undivided cards often came with large writing tabs.


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An additional series of cards labeled Oilette were latter made but they are distinctly different from the earlier cards. These were also printed in tricolor but as bleeds with a textured surface to simulate brush stokes (oilfacsim). Their subjects are more to completely generic and the painting style is more amateurish.


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A less commonly seen Oilette type were printed in 1908 on very heavy paper stock with a very wide margin. These cards have a false plate mark but it is a strange combination for the poor tricolor printing quality here does not match up to the fine art status implied by the plate mark.


Novelty Postcard

Tuck produced a great number of novelty cards, some under the Oilette name. Perhaps their largest novelty set was that of paper dolls, which they had printed apart from postcards since 1893. Similar cards of other types of cutout toys were also made.


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Tuck’s Carbonett’s were printed in sepia rotogravure that closely resembled a photograph. These cards, produced in Great Britain were sparsely hand colored.


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In 1904 Tuck began producing series specifically for the American and Canadian Market, all printed in Holland. The Raphotype view-cards, printed in tinted halftone are consecutively numbered 5000-6100. Some of these were issued in monotone. A black & white Collotype series (6000-6435) and the Silverette series (7000-7435), which were meant to imitate photographs both reproduce many of the same images that were made as Raphotypes.


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Many types of greeting cards of English manufacture were produced in a variety of techniques and issued in numbered series.


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Small sets of cards were printed in untypical techniques. Tuck’s office in Paris published a series of artist singed cards that were printed in France.


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Tuck’s Paris office also published a series of hand colored real photo cards of women that were similar to many other such photo cards manufactured in France.


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Between 1909 and 1914 Tuck issued Picture Puzzles and Father Tuck’s Little Artist Series and the Paintbox Series that contained six perforated cards that could be cut out, along with water based paints. The images on these novelty cards were printed as simple outlines that could be colored in at the discretion of the purchaser.




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C.O. Tucker   (1906-1917)
Boston, MA

Published view-cards of Massachusetts and scenes of the U.S. Life Saving Service in black & white and sepia halftone line block on a textured cream colored paper. In later years they published less distinct cards with other printers.



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R.F. Turnbull   (1895-1905)
New York, NY

A photographer who provided many images of the New York Metropolitan area for use by postcard publishers. Turnbull’s name usually appears on these cards.



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TWA   1930-2001
Leipzig, Saxony

In 1930 the U.S. Government created Transcontinental & Western Airlines by forcing a merger between Transcontinental Air Transport with Western Air Express to provide a reliable carrier for airmail contracts. Though the Air Mail Act of 1934 dissolved the merger the company kept their initials, TWA as they changed their name to Trans World Airlines. They became a major domestic air carrier, the first with coast to coast routes and began international flights out of New York City in 1946. They published many offset lithographic postcards of their air fleet and the murals painted in their lounges. In 2001 they were taken over by American Airlines.



Postcard

Twiss Brothers   (1913)
The Arcade, Ilfracombe, England

A publisher of hand colored postcards made in Saxony depicting the towns of Devon and local events. Some of their view-cards display coats of arms for both the town and county.




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graphic