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Souvenir Post Card Co.   1905-1914
268 Canal Street, New York, NY

A major publisher of a variety of postcard types. They used three different printers over the course of their business, which changed the look of their cards. Some of the early cards were printed with the name E. Frey (owner?) on them. The company was purchased by Valentine and Sons. and they produced cards in America under the name Valentine-Souvenir Co.


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Tinted halftone cards 1-3099 and 12000-14999.


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Green & white 3100-5999 and 15000-up. Many of these cards were reprints of color issues (often with glitter to enhance their dull look) in line block halftone.


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Black & white 6000-11999 in halftone.



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Souvenir Publishing Co.   (1907-1915)
San Francisco, CA

A publisher of books and lithographic postcards.



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Souvenir Publishing & Mercantile Co.   (1906-1908)
Denver, CO

A publisher of view-cards depicting scenes in Colorado. These cards were made through tricolor printing with a highly noticeable RGB pallet.



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Spencer & Co   1864-
Madras, India

The store J.W. Spencer opened in Madras grew into one of the largest department stores in Asia. After becoming a Limited company in 1897 they began to publish tinted halftone postcards of views and types.



Real Photo Postcard

Percy Loomis Sperr   1924-1964
New York, NY

In 1924 Sperr moved to New York City from Columbus, Ohio to further his ambitions as a writer. The photographs he took to illustrate his written work proved to be more popular and so he switched the focus of his career. Sperr would shoot over 30,000 photographs of New York depicting events, streets, and maritime scenes. He sold many of his photos in the form of real photo postcards, and also published older photos by other photographers on postcards. His images were also used by many other postcard publishes. Sperr had worked just about anywhere he wanted in all five boroughs until World War Two when strict security measures were imposed. These restrictions cut into his income and he opened up a used book store to make ends meet.



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Springfield News Co.   (1902-)
Springfield, MA

A publisher and distributor of local postcards for the American News Co.



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Sprouse & Son   (1908-1912)
Tacoma, Washington

Publishers and importers of black & white, monochrome, and color postcards. While most of their cards depicted scenes of Washington and Oregon they produced other types of cards such as exaggerations as well. Many of their cards were imported from Germany.



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Gerhard Stalling AG   1851-
Oldenburg, Germany

An large publisher and printer of illustrated books. They are known for their children’s magazine Dideldum and for promoting the work of Nazis such as the architect Albert Speer. They also produced a number of tricolor postcards. They have an office in Berlin.



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State Art Publishing Agency   (1939)
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

A publisher of art reproductions with many produced as tricolor postcards. Their cards seem to have been printed in a higher quality than other cards produced by the State monopoly IZOGIZ. The titles on these cards were printed in both Russian and English indicating that they were directed toward a foreign audience. They may have been part of an effort to build an alliance with the English speaking world as World War Two was breaking out.



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Star Stationary Co.   (1940s)
Newark, NJ

A publisher of Linen postcards depicting views of New Jersey. They are particularly known for their many scenes of the Jersey shore.



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F.K. Stebbing   (1904-1910)
Paris, France

This photographer published many images as hand colored real photo postcards. These cards covered many themes such as children, actresses, fantasy, romance, and greetings.



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Stedman Brothers, Ltd.   (1908-1915)
Brantford, ON, Canada

A large publisher of black & white and tinted halftone view-cards of central Canada and the Great Lakes region. Though photo based these images went under heavy retouching. Many of these images revolve around railroads though cards were also issued on local Indians and of a patriotic nature as the First World War neared. While most of their printed cards were made in Germany they also produced bordered cards on bromide paper that were manufactured in England.



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Stecher Lithographic Co.   1887-1936
Rochester, NY

Adolph Nolte & Company, founded in 1867, was a lithographic firm that produced posters for seed companies. After Nolte’s interests refocused on the Rochester Beobachter, a newspaper he founded, he sold his lithographic shop to F. Muntz in 1871. Muntz partnered with the printer Frank Stecher who ran the shop, and Anton Rahn who became manager of the art department. Charles F. Mensing bought out Muntz’s share of the firm in 1875, and the name changed from Charles F. Muntz & Co. to Mensing, Rahn & Stecher. Two years later it became Mesning & Stecher after Rahn left to form his own shop. Stecher gained sole control in 1887 and the firm was renamed the Stecher Lithographic Company. They became a major printer of chromolithographic posters, labels and trade cards, and by the turn of the century, artist drawn holiday postcards. In 1936 the Traung Lithographic Company purchased this firm and it became Stecher-Traung. It was purchased again in 1966 by the Schmidt Lithographic Co. to become Stecher-Traung-Schmidt, but they went out of business in 1994.



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Steelograph Co.   (1943-2008)
1 Broadway, New York, NY

This printer first opened in Brooklyn producing different types of engraved material. Many of their early postcards were electrically steel engraved by Dr. Joseph Guttman and have a very distinct look. They also used tricolor line block printing under the Richkrome trade name into the 1950’s. They latter moved to Greenwich, Connecticut.



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Stehli Freres   1902-1995
Zurich, Switzerland

The Stehli brothers were an important printer of art books and fine prints. They also produced many high quality postcards in color photogravure. They are especially known for their artist signed cards of views and of animals. Stehli Freres was purchased by Rosenstiel’s in 1995.



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Stengel & Co.   (1885-1945)
Dresden, Germany

This firm, first called Stengel & Markert was founded by Emil Stengel and Heinrich Markert after buying out the collotype printer, Scherer & Engler. After Markert left to start his own printshop around 1889, the firm assumed the name Stengel & Co. They began producing postcards about this time though they had printed some collotype souvenir cards under their old name at least as far back as 1885. An office was opened in Berlin in 1899 and another factory for collotype and halftone printing followed two years later. They also opened a London office in 1901. Now working as printer, publisher, and distributor, they became the largest producer of postcards in the world. Having expanded into chromolithography, they became a major publisher and printer of fine art cards in their World’s Galleries series. Their chromolithographs employed fourteen to twenty-two litho-stones to achieve subtle coloration. They are possibly the finest quality postcards ever produced. Stengel’s cards were first distributed by O. Flammger, then Misch & Company in Great Britain, and by the Rotograph Company in the United States from whom they took over their production of art cards.

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While Stengel is best known for their art cards they also published a great number of worldwide view-cards. The earliest were produced as black & white collotypes, which began to be hand colored around 1895. The simplicity of these cards make them bare little resemblance in quality to their better known art cards, and they can pass for undistinguished cards made by other publishers. Their inconsistent numbering system helps to make these more difficult to identify and date. More elaborate and higher quality collotypes in monotone, dutone, and color would latter be made.

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Stengel also produced lithographic artist drawn view-cards with a far more limited hues than their art cards, but their artistry in color blending is handled with such skill to give the illusion of a broader palette. A variety of other types of color cards were also produced including tinted halftones.

This firm became a Limited public company in 1906 shortly after the death of Emil Stengel. Around 1909 Joseph Keller became manager of Stengel & Co., and the Keller family was now majority shareholders. By 1913 the firm was increasingly expanding into commercial printing, which may in part been due to tariffs placed on German cards. Following World War One their cards were produced through offset lithography and as bromide real photos. Their factories were heavily damaged during World War Two, but production continued in postwar years after the firm was nationalized into the Volkerfreundschaft by the East German government. Collotype printing continued until 1991 but the Stengel name was only kept for a few years. The Kellers also kept the Stengel & Co. name after moving to Frankfurt but it is unclear as to what they produced.



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Edward Stern & Co.   (1870-1936)
114 N. 12th, Philadelphia, PA

A printer of books since 1870. Published a number of art postcards. They are best known for their four sets of Roosevelt Bear cards. Rufus Hill owned many of their copyrights and his name appears on many cards.



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Ignatz Stern   1905-1910
578 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, NY

Published halftone view-cards mostly of Long Island, Brooklyn, and New York City though other eastern locations were covered as well. His early black & white cards used a noticibly open halftone pattern. These cards were printed in Leipzig, Germany.



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M. Sternberg   (1905-1925)
Hong Kong, China

A bookseller and stationer who was also a major wholesaler and retailer of postcards depicting views and types of Honk Kong. His cards were printed as black & white and tinted collotypes. These cards were titled in English for an English audience and sold through a number of shops.



Stevengraph

Thomas Stevens Ltd.   1869-1940
Cox Street, Coventry, England

A weaver since 1869, who began producing silk bookmarks in 1876 named Stevengraphs. He went on to expanded this process into creating other types of silk images including elaborate postcards in 1903. His factory was destroyed during an air raid in 1940. At least 117 different titles were produced.



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Stewart & Woolf   (1900-1940’s)
8-9 Charles Street, London, England

A publisher of many unique artist drawn postcards and playing cards. Many of their early cards were printed in continuous tone lithography in Bavaria with metallic spot colors. These include series on holidays, literature, opera, and sayings. A very distinct set depicts views presented in silhouette form with liberal doses of metallic overprinting. They later went on to publish a number of view-cards in halftone lithography. Some of these manufactured in Saxony were hand colored.



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The William E. Stieren Co., Inc.   1863-1908
544 Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, PA

After his arrival from Prussia Stieren became a manufacturer of optical and mathematical instruments. By 1888 he began producing stereo-views, which were supplanted by black & white view-cards in 1903. He continued to sell architectural supplies in addition to these German made cards.



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Georg Stilke   1858-1936
Berlin, Germany

Georg Stilke started his career in publishing as an apprentice in the shop of F. Schneider & Co. in Berlin. He not only went on to acquire this bookseller; with new partners he founded the publishing house of George Cordier & von Muyden. He eventually sold off most of these interests to pursue magazine publishing, and launched The Presence in 1872 with his partner Paul Lindau. They would start a second magazine, Cordier in 1878. By the time Stilke died in 1900, he was also a book publisher of some size and produced lithographic art prints. Once the firm was in the hands of his son Herman Stilke, they began producing many more postcards, especially collotype view-cards of Europe and Palestine. some of these were hand colored in a simple pallet, and other cards were issued as real photos. During the First World War, Stilke published a series of propaganda card booklets called The Great War in pictures.



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Stobbs Press   (1894-1967)
16 Mechanic Street, Worcester, MA

Founded by Charles R. Stobbs as a publisher of books. They later began producing tinted halftone view-cards of somewhat poor quality.



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Seneca Ray Stoddard   1860’s-1915
Glens Falls, NY

Stoddard began his career as a commercial painter of signs and railroad car interiors. In the 1860’s he joined George Conkey in the production of stereo-views of the Adirondack Mountains of New York. By 1873 Stoddard was taking photos for the Adirondack Railway and publishing his own guide books. His work as a photographer, writer, and cartographer contributed to the formation of the Adirondack Park in 1892. He produced over 10,000 photographs, which also included images of Alaska, Palestine, and Norway. Many of his photos were published as printed postcards for the National Railway News Company in Albany.



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Frederick A. Stokes Co.   1890-1941
New York, NY

This important publisher was born from the earlier F.A. Stokes & Brother. They produced many finely printed illustated books and were a pioneer of the three plate color engraving process. They also published a great many postcards of varying subjects covering the comic, romantic, historical, and patriotic through process printing. They hired 48 artists to produce their initial sets of cards, which became big news at that time. Snna W. Betts, Anita Le Roy, and Richard Felton Outcault all produced artist signed cards for them. They also produced a number of paper dolls.



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H.H. Stratton   (1908-1915)
Chattanooga, TN

Published international view-cards and manufactured patriotic souvenirs. They are best known for their postcards depicting scenes of the Great White Fleet at call in various ports around the world. Some of their black & white cards had false real photo backs. Also published Tarjeta Postals of Cuba. They were notorious for stealing images from other publishers, retouching them, and then printing them under their own name.



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Arthur Strauss   (1900-1905)
New York, NY

Published black & white line block postcards in an open halftone. Some blue and red were added to their distinct front logo design and to their political cards. Some of their later postcards were printed in full color.



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Ferdinand Strauss & Co.   (1890’s)
New York, NY

A publisher of eight known pioneer souvenir cards in lithography. They consist of four views of Washington, DC, three views of New York, and one of Lake George, NY. In addition he produced a variety of printed toys and novelties.



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Hermann Striemann   (1910-1920)
Cottbus, Germany

A publisher of regional view-cards including scenes of Palestine in continuous photo-chromolithography. Many of his view-cards incorporate local types.



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Strobridge Lithographers   1867-1960
Cincinnati, OH

Elijah Middleton’s steel and copper plate engraving business had been in operation for eight years when Hines Strobridge joined them in 1855. In four years he had become a partner and in 1861 he took over the management of what was now Middleton, Strobridge & Company. In 1865 Herman Gerlach joined as a new partner but the arrangement was sort lived as the business burnt down the following year. In 1867 it was resurrected as Strobridge & Company. They printed a fine line of chromolithographic products but were best known for their posters of Civil War battle scenes, the circus, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, and Sarah Bernhardt’s American tour drawn by Alphonse Mucha. They also published many trade cards, especially for the theater, and a wide variety of postcards. They were also known for printing extremely large images, many of which were were assembled into billboards. In 1881 they changed their name to the Strobridge Lithographing Company, which burnt down again in 1887. After Strobridge died in 1909 the company changed course and began printing in halftone three years later. In 1936 They purchased the Henderson Litho Company, which had been an important competitor. They in turn were bought out by H. S. Crocker in 1960 where it remains a division of that company in Norwalk, OH.



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Theodor Stroefer   1877-1958
Nuremburg, Bavaria

Stroefer began his career working for the Munich publisher Friedrich Bruckmann. In 1866 he was sent to New York City where he opened an office for the firm. While there he met Georg Kirchner, and in 1871 they joined together to form their own publishing business, Stroefer and Kichner. Stroefer returned to Munich in 1876 where he opened an office for his own New York firm. The following year the partnership was dissolved with Kirchner & Co. taking over the American market and Theodore Stroefer would serve Europe. By the time Stroefer moved his firm to Nuremburg in 1893 he was a well known publisher of many chromolithographic products that included children’s popup books, calendars, and games. After accessing artwork from Ernst Nister ’s Art institute of Photographic Reproduction, Stroefer became an early publisher of postcards. He reproduced the work of many popular artists including Raphael Kichner, Arthur Thiele, and Max Klinger. Stroefer was still reproducing military themed art in chromolithography during World War One but the firm changed over to tricolor printing in the postwar years. After Theodor died in 1927 his son took over the business. Their facilities were greatly damaged toward the end of World War Two and the company closed altogether in 1958.



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F.G.O. Stuart   1902-1923
57-61 Cromwell Road, Southampton, England

Francis Goldelphin Osborne Stuart was a landscape and marine photographer of Hampshire, London, and the Channel Islands. His career began in London in 1873 where he manufactured hand made cameras but he moved to Southampton ten years later. It was not until 1902 that Stuart began publishing many of his images as tinted and hand colored collotype postcards. These cards were printed in Germany until the First World War. He is also well noted for his real photo postcards of the large steamships that docked at Southampton. During WWI he worked for the War Office for Docks recording battle damage to warships on film. In all Stuart published about 2500 postcards, some of which were produced after his death by his son in-law Charles S.S. Dawson.



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J. Studnicke & Co.   (1898-1927)
Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

A bookseller who published photographically based and artist signed postcards that largely depicted ethnic types of the Balkans. They were printed in photo-chromolithography and through the tricolor process by M. Schulz in Prague. Their latter cards were produced in continental size. They are also known for there finely printed portfolios of views.



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Styles & Cash, Inc.   (1865-1920)
135 West 14th Street, New York, NY

This stationer became a printer and binder of books as well as other lithographic products that eventually included postcards.



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Success Postal Card Co.   (1910-1922)
New York, NY

Published postcards in black & white and tinted halftone. Their cards were printed in Berlin, Germany.



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Suhling & Koehn Co.   (1904-1912)
Chicago, IL

A publisher of regional view-cards, holiday cards, and baseball cards. They used a variety of printers who created cards in a number of different techniques from black & white, monochrome, and hand colored collotypes to tinted halftones.



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Sun News Co.   (1940-)
St. Petersburg, FL

A publisher of many Linen and Photochome postcards depicting local views and tourist attractions.



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Sunny Scenes, Inc.   (1929-1939)
Winter Park, FL

Printed and published hand colored collotype view-cards of a number of States but predominantly of Florida, California, and Hawaii. These cards are characterized by their bright colors, generic subjects, and photo like appearance.



Sun Sculpture Studio

See Underwood & Underwood



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O. Svanoe   (1899-1906)
Bergen, Norway

A photographer who published his work as black & white and tinted collotype view-cards.



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Ernst G. Svanstrom   (1908-1914)
Stockholm, Sweden

A major publisher of postcards, especially holiday and view-cards. These cards were manufactured in sepia and with hand coloring. Many of there cards were sold in Russia and deal in Russian themes.



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Svenska Litografiska, AB   1911-1929
Stockholm, Sweden

The Light Press Institute founded by Paul Heckscher and Carl Nilsson in 1900 was called Svenska Litografiska between 1911 and 1929. They produced holiday and view cards in monotones and in color.



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Frank Swallow   (1904-1942)
Exeter, NH

A publisher of halftone line block view-cards of northern New England. Many of their cards were crudely hand colored.



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Max Swatschek   1902-1940
Salzburg, Austria

A bookseller who also published a large number of souvenir books and postcards. These cards were printed in black & white and through the tricolor process, many of which were artist signed.



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Swedish American Line   1914-1975
Gothenburg, Sweden

Founded as the North American Shipping Corporation they opened a route between Sweden and New York. With their major competitors, the German lines, out of service during the First world war they were able to rapidly expand. They published a number of postcards depicting their ships in different styles over the years. Though they carried some freight into the 1980’s, passenger service and the postcards made for them ended in 1975.



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E.A. Sweetman & Son   (1920-1928)
Tunbridge Wells, England

A photographer, publisher, and printer of gravure and real photo postcards depicting views of southern England. Different types of cards were made under different names such as the Domino Series, Solograph, and Sunshine Series that included hand colored photos. Sologloss were glossy sepia photos and Sologlaze were in a deep brown. Sweetman also printed cards in black & white and sepia photogravure under the names De Luxe Photogravure and Solograph de Luxe.




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