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Sackett & Wilhelms Corp.   1889-1950
1013 Grand Street, New York

Charles Wilhelms worked as a printer in the lithography shops of Seibert & Brother and Snyder & Black before becoming a partner in Schmolze Bros. & Wilhelms sometime in the late 1870Ős. In 1882 He formed a partnership with Robert Sackett and Edward Betzig to become Sackett, Wilhelms & Betzig. This firm concentrated on printing advertising, sheet music covers, and trade cards. When Betzig left in 1889 the company changed their name to Sackett & Wilhelms. They expanded over the years to print other items such as postcards. In 1902 they became the first business to install air conditioning to to enhance printing conditions affected by humidity in their Brooklyn factory.



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Commune of Saint Eugenia   1898-1917
St. Petersburg, Russia

A subsidiary to the committee of the Red Cross that published many cards as a method of raising funds for its Sister of Mercy nurses. They created artist drawn chromolithographic cards with the work of such notables as E. Bem, Bevenshtam, Bilbin, Pimonenko, Smukrovich, and Zarubin. These postcards tend to exhibit a folksy style that was common to the Union of Russian Artists. While expensive to produce they were marketed at high prices since they were to aid charity. They also published monochromatic cards of views and the Czar. They were not only one of the first to publish postcards in Russia, their cards were considered to be the highest quality. Hampered by war they finally closed during the Russian Revolution.



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St. Louis News Co.   (1881-)
St. Louis, MO

A publisher and distributor of printed materials including postcards. They were an agent for the American News Company for much of their history.



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St. Paul Souvenir Co.   (1907-1910)
St. Paul, MN

A publisher of local view-cards. Some of their German made cards were printed as high quality tinted collotypes in which the colors look as if they were hand painted on.

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This firm also produced postcards through the tricolor process.



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N. Coll Salieti   (1920’s)
Barcelona, Spain

A publisher of art reproductions and artist signed postcards through tricolor printing. Best known for his portraiture of Spanish women in traditional native dress.



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J. Salmon Ltd.   1880-
Sevenoaks, England

Publisher who began producing view-cards under the trade names Gravure Style, Sepia, Sepia-Style, and Sepiatone. Around 1903 a local artist, C. Essenhigh Corke, provided watercolors to Salmon for postcards. This started a trend toward reproducing views in watercolors rather than by photographic images. Other notable artists followed such as W.W. Quatremain and A.R. Quinton who painted 2300 landscapes for their postcards between 1911 and 1934. While most cards were issued under the Salmon Series name, some painted views were put out under the name Oilochrom. They also produced comic cards, animals, military subjects, railway cards, and a series of illustrated cats by Lois Wain.



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Salon des Paris   1725-
Paris, France

While the Solon’s roots date back to 1648 it only later became the official exhibitor of the Académie des Beaux-Arts. Their yearly exhibitions were the most prestigious in Europe for many years. The Société des Artistes Francais took over the Salon in 1881 after it lost government sponsorship. By 1890 schisms began to siphon of members and it began loosing its prominence. They were an early publisher of tricolor postcards depicting art work from their shows. While postcards containing nudes was still considered provocative in the United States, the same images were looking conservative in the face of Europe’s avant-garde.



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Samson Brothers   (1909-1919)
New York, NY

A printer and publisher of artist drawn postcards that encompassed blacks, romance, greetings, holiday cards and humor. While many of their greeting and holiday cards were printed in Germany, their halftone cards printed in the United States that include commemoratives for the Hudson-Fulton celebration are not known for their quality.



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J.J. Samuels, Ltd.   (1907-1908)
Lother Arcade, London, England

A printer, publisher, and distributor of postcards. They are best known for their tricolor view-cards of London issued in the Arcadian Series, their hand colored comic cards, and real photo cards of Actresses and children.



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San Antonio Card Co.   (1944-)
San Antonio, TX

A publisher of Linens and Photochromes depicting local views and cowboys with a number of large letter cards as well.



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Sanborn Souvenir   (1920-1976)
Denver, CO

A publisher of books and postcards of the American West, but mostly of Colorado and Wyoming. They first produced real photo postcards carrying the Sanborn name. They latter went on to produce tinted halftone postcards and eventually photochromes.



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Sanborn Vail & Co.   (1860-1924)
Market Street, San Francisco, CA

This firm was a large wholesaler and retailer of stationary, picture frames, art supplies, and artwork. After they incorporated in 1902 they began publishing postcards. While they did some printing work themselves, most of their postcards were printed in Germany in tinted halftone. They had branches in Los Angeles and Portland, Oregon.



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W. Sander & Son   (1898-1906)
Geestemunde, Germany

A publisher of chromolithographic and tinted collotype postcards that largely depicted ocean liners and maritime scenes.



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Sandford Card Co.   (1908-1914)
Dansville, NY

A publisher of lithographic greeting and holiday cards.



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Sandoval News Service   (1940-1953)
El Paso, Texas

Published and distributed linen postcards of cowboy poetry and regional views and types that included Mexico. Many of their cards were printed by Tichnor Brothers.



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Sands’ Studio   (1935-1940)
Nassau, Bahamas

A publisher of brightly colored local view-cards in tinted halftone. Many cards depict the native population engaged in traditional activities.



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Santway Photo-Craft Co.   (1917-1941)
Dansville, NY

A publisher of view-cards that mostly depicted scenes of the Adirondacks and Green Mountains of Vermont.



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Sapirstein Greeting Card Co.   1906-1938
Cleveland, OH

Jacob Sapirstein began as a jobber of German made postcards in 1905. This provided enough revenue for him to start up his own company and he soon grew to become a major distributor of cards and self service racks. By 1936 he was printing is own postcards and greetings, and in 1938 the company name was changed to American Greetings Publishers. Much corporate reshuffling and buyouts took place in the years that followed. Carlton Cards of Canada was acquired in 1956, Rust Craft in 1980, and Gibson Greetings in 2000.



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Sarrafian Brothers   1897-1925
Beirut, Syria (now Lebenon)

Photographer Abraham Sarrafian was joined by his brothers Boghos and Samuel to take, publish, and distribute photographs. Beirut was then part of the Ottoman Empire and they worked there through the years of the French Mandate that was established following World War One. They captured about 25 percent of all images made of the area stretching from Libya then back to Turkey. They published over 1500 photo-chromolithographic postcards of ethnic types and views.



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Johaan Saska   (1908-1948)
Krems, Austria

An art publisher who also produced art cards and view-cards in monochrome and tricolor printing. His cards often had elaborate graphics on their backs.



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Sauberlin & Pfeiffer   (1905-1941)
Vevey, Switzerland

A printer and publisher that used line block with a simple RYBK pallet. The posters and postcards they produced displayed a flat graphic style.



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Emil Sauerwein   (1897-1902)
Aschaffenburg, Bavaria

A publisher of elaborate Gruss aus cards in chromolithography, some with embossing and gold spot printing.



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Charles Roscoe Savage   1875-1926
Salt Lake City, UT

An important portrait and landscape photographer of the American West. After becoming a Mormon he moved to Salt Lake City from England in 1860. Savage set up the Art Bazar in 1875 to market his photographs, but it burnt down in 1883 destroying all his work. The store was rebuilt from which he sold a wide variety of card photos and stereo-views. Many of his images were later turned into halftone lithographic postcards printed by Edward H. Mitchell. After Savage died in 1909 his son continued to run the Art Bazar but it once again burnt in 1911 destroying all his negatives. His son however continued to sell his surviving work until 1926.



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E.W. Savory, Ltd.   (1889-1920)
Bristol, England

A printer and fine art publisher in chromolithography. They became publishers of artist signed postcards. Their subjects consisted mainly of landscapes though many ethnic, animal, glamour, and hunting cards were produced as well. They later produced cards in photogravure under the trade name Bromogravure.



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Sawyer Scenic Photo   1920- 1940’s
725 SW 20 Place, Portland, OR

A publisher of many printed and real photo view-cards. In 1939 they invented the View Master as an alternative to the postcards whose market was declining.



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Harold T. Sawyer Photo and Art Shop.   (1934-1940)
Chatham, MA

A photographer who published black & white and tinted collotype view-cards of Cape Cod. He also managed the photo shop of his father, Charles Sawyer, in Concord NH until 1980.



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E. Sborgi   (1910-1917)
Florence, Italy

A major printer and publisher of chromolithographic art cards that mostly depicted paintings from the Italian Renaissance. These cards were printed in Italy.



Scenic America Publishing Co.
(see Kiser Photo Co.)



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Scenic Photo Publishing Co.   (1927)
Seattle, WA

A publisher of real photo postcards depicting scenes of the American West. Their cards covered many subjects included ships, trains, and cowboys. When everything was lost to a fire the business closed.



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Schaar & Dathe   1895-1934
Trier, Germany

This large printing house produced a variety of printed matter in lithography, letterpress, but especially collotype. By 1900 they were also producing postcards. As they grew they opened additional offices in Milan and Naples. When hard economic times hit they reorganized their business as Schaar & Dathe, Ernst Klein AG, but they still were forced to close within a year.



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Otto Schallerer   (1910-1968)
Seward, AK

A photographer of southern Alaska whose views were turned into many real photo postcards and sold from the Alaska Store. He moved to Ketchikan in 1930 and began working with Jack Thwaties on a series of scenic photo books. When Thwaties retired he bought the business and turned it into Schallerer’s Photo Shop. Most of his photo work were of local scenes though he is noted for his aerial photography. The store was again sold in 1965 but retained the same name until it closed in 2006.



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J.H. Schaefer   (1900-1912)
Amsterdam, Netherlands

A publisher of collotype postcards depicting views and scenes from street life printed in black & white and with a broad range of tints. Some of these cards were embossed and have metallic spot printing on them. They also published brown toned real photo cards with hand coloring under the name Rembrant Edition.



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I. Scheff & Brothers   (1906-1912)
San Francisco, CA

A publisher of hand colored and tinted halftone view-cards that were printed in Germany. While the vast majority of these postcards depicted real views throughout the American West, some cards incorporated fantasy. Many of their postcards also depicted scenes from the San Francisco Earthquake.



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I. Scheff Engraving Co., Inc.   (1930’s-)
480 Canal Street, New York

A commercial printer of a wide variety of items including postcards. Their black & white and sepia cards were printed in the unusual technique of electric engraving on steel plates. They currently operate out of West Babylon, NY.



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Louis Scheiner   (1912-1921)
Portland, OR

A publisher of local scenes emphasizing logging, railroads, and views of the Columbia River. His used a number of different printers to produce his tinted halftone postcards.



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Scherer, Nabholz & Co.   (1860-1911)
Moscow, Russia

These two Swiss photographers, N.N. Scherer and G.I. Nabholz moved to Moscow in 1860. They produced cabinet cards depicting famous authors, actors, Russian types, and the czar for A.I. May and M.A. Schindler. After postcards became popular the firm became an important publisher of black & white collotype view-cards that were sold from the Dazziaro art shop.



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Karl von Schinacher   (1930’s)
Friedrichshafen, Germany

A publisher of view-cards. The Zeppelin Airship Company also built their craft in Friedrichshafen within a special hanger floating on Lake Constance. A good number of these airships are included on Schinacher postcards.



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O. Schleich Nachf   (1898-1924)
Dresden, Saxony

A publisher of hand colored and monochrome collotypes, and chromolithograph artist signed postcards. They may have once been part of Goldammer & Schleich Nachf.



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Schlesinger Brothers   (1907-1920’s)
New York, NY

Photographers who published a number of holiday cards and hand colored images of women. They also produced a number of generic view-cards in a fine gravure with wide borders and a false plate mark, plus comic, holiday, and artist signed glamour postcards.



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Otto Schloss   (1890’s-1920)
Berlin, Germany

This was a large printing and publishing house established by Otto and Frieda Schloss that also did much business as a paper wholesaler. They produced chromolithographic greeting cards, comic cards, and art reproductions. In 1909 they bought out the greeting card company of B. Schwenke.



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Henri Schlumpf   (1880-1902)
Winterthur, Switzerland

An important chromolithographer who produced illustrated books and gruss aus souvenir cards. He also published a set of cards on the Swiss military.



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Arthur P. Schmidt & Co.   (1888-1916)
324 Dearborn, Chicago, IL and Boston, MA

A publisher of sheet music and lithographic postcards. Many of their cards illustrated with interiors and the upper class that inhabited them were designed as generic stock to which advertising could be added. Sometimes only the backs of these cards had ads on them.



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Earnst Schmidt & Co.   (1908-1912)
Lubeck, Germany

A publisher of view-cards depicting scenes throughout the world. These cards were published in black & white, and tinted colotypes with an extra blue plate. They also produced real photo postcards.



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Edgar Schmidt   (1998-1903)
Budapest, Hungry and Dresden, Saxony

A publisher of fine chromolithographic and black & white postcards. They produced cards on a variety of themes but are noted for their opera series. Schmidt also published many views and images of women as real photo postcards.



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H.R. Schmidt & Co.   1911-1923
Wichita, KS

Henry R. Schmidt Moved to Wichita, Kansas in 1911 where he established himself as a postcard publisher in the Butts Building. The following year he opened a second office in Denver, Colorado. This firm primarily produced local view-cards, but they also published comic and artist signed cards.



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Otto Schmidt & Son   ((1906-1910)
944 Third Avenue, New York, NY

Published monochrome and black & white view-cards depicting local scenes, especially related to healthcare. This firm seems to be related to the Teddy Bear Toy Company but it uncertain whether they owned them or just manufactured their tin promotional signs.



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H.A.J. Shultz   (1898-1905)
Hamburg, Germany

A publisher of chromolithographed European and Palestinian view-cards. They also produced postcards for the Hamburg-Amerika Line.



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Schulze Litho & Post Card Co.   (1909-1910)
New York, NY

A printer of lithographic products including postcards. Their tinted halftone cards have a very bright and unblended pallet creating a distinct and highly mannered look.



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E. J. Schwabe Publishing Co.   (1907-1909)
New York, NY

Published historical scenes and view-cards of many States. Their German made cards in tinted collotype used a blue key plate instead of black.



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Lange B. L. Schwalbach   (1907)
Boston, MA

Published view-cards of the American East and a set of Colonial Heroes with elaberate borders in chromolithography. These cards were printed in Germany.



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E. A. Schwerdtfeger & Co.   1894-)
Berlin, Germany

Published calendars, glanzbilder, and was one of the largest producers of real photo postcards on bromide paper, many of which were hand colored. Their largest series of cards dealt with actresses, children, coronation portraits, and holidays, but their best known postcards are of fashionable women, often in exotic costumes. Opened a office at 28 Monkswell Street in London, England and a New York office at 733 Broadway in 1910. After turning into a public company, the photo paper manufacturer Mimosa became a large shareholder. This firm took over the postcard department of the German, New Photographic Society in 1922. All their cards were printed in Berlin, Germany. Their factory suffered severe damage during World War Two but they reopened to become one of Germany’s largest greeting card companies.



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