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Obpacher Brothers (Gebr. Obpacher)    1867-1988
Munich, Bavaria

This printing and publishing firm was founded by the brothers Johann and Joseph Obpacher. They were commercial lithographers who produced childrenŐs books, greeting cards, reward cards, postcards, and art prints. As business grew they opened offices in Berlin, Paris, London, New York, and Chicago but continued printing operations in Munich. They became a public company in 1888 and soon began publicizing themselves as Lithograhisch Artistische Anstalt, formally Gebruder Obpacher. Their New York subsidiary on Duane Street was called the Art Lithographic Publishing Co., and in London The Artistic Lithographic Co. After merging with Mueller & Co. in 1939 they changed their name to Obpacher AG. They seem to have stopped producing cards soon after as World War Two broke out, but resumed again in the 1950’s with view-cards. In 1970 they took the name Obpacher GmbH.



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Oblats of Marie-Immaculate   1816-
Paris, France

A Catholic religious order founded in Marseilles in 1816 by the French priest Eugene de Mazenod. While their original efforts were focused on the revitalization of the Church after the turbulent years of Revolutionary France, they later became heavily involved in missionary work. These new efforts were particularly strong in Canada, to which missionaries were first sent in 1841. They primarily worked in the Yukon and Northwest Territories but also served in Alaska. When postcards came into vogue they began to use them for fundraising purposes, publishing many strong images of the native populations of these regions in simple black & white.



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Ocean Comfort Co. m.b.h.   (1920’s-1930’s)
Bremen, Germany

This was a private company that provided exclusive services to the North German Lloyd Line. Highly trained saleswomen who were knowledgeable in the arts in both German and English were assigned to salons aboard steamships. Here they provided a number of items specifically oriented to first class passengers including a range of high quality postcards. It was usually all business as the saleswomen traveled tourist class.



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Carl H. Odemar   (1903-1907)
Magdeburg, Germany

A publisher of Gruss aus, large letter, and view-cards as black & white and hand colored collotypes as well as real photo postcards.


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Oklahoma News Co.   (1924-1956)
Tulsa, OK

A publisher and distributor of postcard views, cowboys, cowboy songs and poetry, and large letter cards.


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H. Enida Olive Co., Ltd.   (1912-1920)
Calgary, AB, Canada

This photographer published printed view-cards of local scenes in black & white, dutone, and hand colored.



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Lars Olsens   (1909-1910)
Stavanger, Norway

A publisher of Norwegian view-cards in tinted collotype.



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Omaha News Co.   (1890-)
Omaha, NE

A publisher and distributor of local view-cards and other printed materials for the American News Company.



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Gobindram Oodeyram   1880’s-1970’s
Jaipur, India

The most important photo studio in the Jaipur region of India for 90 years. In addition to their many landscapes they captured local types ranging from numerous dancing girls to the Maharajah. Many of these images were transformed into finely printed monochromatic postcards in collotype, the more important of which were hand colored or tinted.



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Oreste Onestinghel   1901-
Verona, Italy

A publisher of books and postcards ranging from early monochromes and chromolithographs to modern photochromes. Most of their cards depict scenes in Verona but there are other views of northern Italy and art reproductions as well.



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Oppel & Hess   (1927-1951)
Jena, Germany

Published artist signed postcards primarily dealing with fantasy, fairytales, and silhouettes.



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Oregon News   (1906-1936)
Portland, Oregon

A distributor of postcards for the American News Company. They also published regional view-cards in tinted line block halftones that included many scenes of the Columbia River.



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Orient Royal Mail Line   1906-1909
London, England

This line was formed after the Pacific Steam Navigation Company sold its interests and liners serving Australia to the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company. Though this arrangement was dissolved in only three years, postcards were produced for its passengers traveling between London and Australia. Remnants of this brief merger went on to become the Orient Pacific Line.



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Fernando Organia   1877-1911
Venice, Italy

This publisher produced books, prints and postcards depicting local scenes printed in black & white and color photogravure.


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O.S. & P.C. Co.   (1907-1910)
Sydney, Australia

Published collotype view-cards of local scenes, many of which were hand colored. Those cards issued under the Oceanic Series name were manufactured in Prussia.


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Osborne Ltd.   (1904-1908)
22 East 21st Street, New York, NY

A publisher of artist signed postcards and view-cards of the mid-Atlantic States. They were printed in the tricolor process with an extra black plate.



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The Osborne Co.   (1899-1948)
Newark, NJ

After splitting up with his partner, Thomas Murphy at the Red Oak Independent newspaper in Iowa, Edmund Osborne moved to New Jersey where he set a a printing firm. He became well known for his calendars before his death in 1916. The company continued on and also began to print novelty items and lithographic postcards, especially for advertising. They should not be confused with the C.S. Osborne Company also in Newark who manufactured leather working tools. Any family relationship between the two is unknown.



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I. & M. Ottenheimer Co.   1890-
Pine Street, Baltimore, MD

These brothers, Isaac and Moses Ottenheimer sold a variety of publications but are known for their joke books by the fictional Moe & Joe Ott. They went on to published a great many view-cards of the mid-Atlantic region from early hand colored cards to linens. In 1963 with the grandsons now running the business the firm moved to Pimlico.



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J. Ottmann Litho. Co.   (1885-1907)
Puck Building, New York, NY

This company grew out of the older lithographic printing firm Meyer, Herkel & Ottmann in the 1880’s. They set up shop in New York’s Puck Building where they supplied printed illustrations for Puck Magazine. Together they formed the largest printing works within a single structure. Ottmann also produced other chromolithographic products such as toys, paper dolls, advertising cards, trade cards, and comic postcards.



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F.A. Owen Co.   (1915-1927)
Dansville, NY

This book and magazine publisher also produced a large number of greeting and holiday cards.



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Owen Card Publishing   (1915-1927)
1621 Lake, Elmira, New York

The Baker Brothers had been local news dealers since the 1890’s and began publishing postcards of regional views under there name in the early 20th century. Around 1915 they started up the Owen Card Publishing Company that specifically dealt with greeting and holiday cards. These cards were printed on a linen embossed paper and often contained large empty areas, a typical American design. The company later became involved with designing boxes for cards as well.



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Owens Brothers - Hillson Co.   (1905-1938)
Boston, MA

Published a wide variety of postcard types in black & white, monotones, and color lithography. These included cards depicting actresses, blacks, comics, artist signed cards, and national view-cards. Their most unusual cards were of views printed on aluminum. They also had offices in Berlin and Leipzig.



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Oxford University Press   1896-
Oxford, England

This publisher of scholarly materials has grown to become the largest university press in the world. The produced many art reproductions on postcards for a number of different cultural institutions. These black & white cards do not always capture the subtleties and detail needed to properly display the art works they depict.




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