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Real Photo Postcard

J. Gaberell A.G.   (1923-1949)
Thalwil, Zurich, Switzerland

This company published the photographs of Jean Gaberell, with many manufactured as real photo postcards. He is best known for his views of the Alps and figures engaged in winter sports.

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Many of Gaberell’s photographs were also printed as postcards in color photogravure on a textured paper.



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Gale & Polden, Ltd.   1892-1981
Aldershot, England

The origins of this large printing and publishing firm began in 1866 when James Gale opened a book shop in Chatham. Seven years later he began printing books and by 1877 he took on Ernest Polden as an apprentice. They worked well together moving to a larger establishment in Aldershot in 1888 and joining together to form a Limited Partnership with an office in London in 1892. Most of the work they produced was military related, which led them to open a third office in Portsmouth to help capture business from the Royal Navy. In 1901 they began publishing postcards in halftone lithography. These cards also largely dealt with military themes, as they produced series on Regiments, Naval Ships, Admiral Nelson, humorous naval nicknames, and more. They also produced view-cards but even many of these scenes were somehow related to the military. In 1963 they were purchased by the Purnell Group and after a number of further buy-offs they finally shut down their printing facilities in 1981.



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P.J. Gallais & Cie   (1910-1917)
38 Rue Vignon, Paris, France

Published artist signed cards, political satire, and risque subjects all in chromolithography. Noted for their illustrated work by Hansi and Harri Zislin. Many of their illustrated cards promoted pro-French propaganda concerning the German control of Alsace. During the First World War their cards were printed on paper rather than card stock.



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Ewing Galloway Agency   1920-
New York, NY

Ewing Galloway was a journalist and photo editor. He left the employment of Underwood & Underwood to start his own stock news agency in 1920. He concentrated on non-timely subjects giving his photographs a much longer commercial life. Many of this agency’s photos were used by various publishers to create view-cards of cities such as New York, Chicago, and Detroit. When Galloway died in 1953 the agency had stockpiled over 400,000 images. Most of their photographers remain unknown as few records were ever kept.



Novelty Postcard

G. A. Novelty Co.   (1908-1910)
New York, NY

A publisher of simple greeting and unique novelty postcards. They were manufactured in Germany.



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Marshal Gardner   1910-1940
16 Main Street, Nantucket, MA

A well known photographer of Nantucket and Bermuda. Gardner was the sole agent for the Eastman Kodak Company on the Island. He published black & white collotype postcards of Nantucket Island from his photographs, which he sold from his shop. Many of his images were contracted out to the Detroit Publishing Company for color printing who also published variations of these same images for their own distribution.

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After the Detroit Publishing company stopped printing cards in 1932 Gardner continued to publish cards with a number of different printers. Three years later he began working with the Photochrome Process Company to reproduce his most popular images previously printed by Detroit. These cards sometimes went under the name Nantuckromes but they were not of the same quality as earlier cards.



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S.E. Garland   1888-1920’s
177 Water Street, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

The store of Samuel Eliot Garland who served as the local bookseller, stationer, and news agent. Garland published some books and was the first to sell postcards in Newfoundland. Many of these local view-cards were printed as tinted collotypes with an extra blue plate under the Photo-Iris Series name. Although his store burnt down in 1892 and again in 1908 he rebuilt and operated it until his retirement in the 1920’s.



Real Photo Postcard

The Garraway Co.   1909’s-
Rutherford, NJ

Published real photo postcards of national views. They would take orders from many small shops and pharmacies, and then produce cards for them.



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Gartner & Bender   (1911-1918)
Chicago, IL

Published art, comic, and holiday postcards, but they are best known for their cards depicting children and women. They produced illustrated cards with reoccurring characters such as Kewpie Angel and Dolly Dimples.



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J. Geiser   (1862-1913)
Algiers, Algeria

Jean-Baptiste Antoine Alary had already been photographing scenes in Algeria during the 1850’s when Lucien Jacob Geiser joined him. They set up a shop together under the name Alary & Geiser, but when Jacob died his wife Julie Geiser took over his half of the shop in 1862. Five years later Alary would also die and the shop was turned over to Julie’s three photographer sons under the name Geiser Freres. They continued to print the work of Alary but under their name. By the 1870’s the shop was left in the hands of only one brother, Jean Theophile Geiser who changes the shops name once again to J. Geiser painting & photography. This complicated family history makes it impossible to directly attribute images to any one individual. But taken as a whole they were the most important photographers of Algeria during the 19th century going into the 20th. Many of there images were published as tinted collotype postcards..



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John Gehles   (1914-1923)
Elmhurst, NY

Gehles was a Bavarian immigrant who became a postcard publisher in Queens County, New York. Most of his output consisted of local views printed in average quality haftones. Some of these black & white cards were modestly hand colored. While many of the scenes he captured seem nondescript, they represent subjects rarely covered by other publishers.



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P.C. Geissler   (1840-1915)
Nuremberg, Bavaria

A book publisher that began illustrating book with steel engravings. They published artist signed postcards in the 20th century through tricolor printing.



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Gemloid Corp.   (1934-1952)
New York, NY

This firm primarily manufactured sheet plastic until 1939 when they began producing molded plastic items. That same year they published a set of boxed postcards depicting scenes from the New York Worlds Fair under the Metalite name. These images were printed on metal foil that was overlaid with a thin layer of plastic that carried a design.



Real Photo Postcard

Genuine Photo Co.   (1907-1908)
Staten Island, NY

Produced hand colored real photo postcards of Staten Island scenery and buildings. Their cards were tinted in broad swaths rather than with detailed brushwork. While some cards have a title or company name embossed into their tabs, many are without any printed identification. Almost all however have some identifying writing on the image from the negative being scratched into.



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Georgia News Co.   (1908-)
Atlanta, GA

A publisher and distributor of local view-cards for the American News Company.



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Gerlach & Schenk   (1879-1908)
Vienna, Austria

This important publishing house of the fine and applied arts reproduced the work of some of the finest artists of their day. Martin Gerlach had great interest in art and science and made sure to cover the most cutting edge material. Between 1895 and 1900 they issued Allegories, a folio of art reproductions, and they were the first to reproduce the work of the Vienna Secession in 1897. A year later they began publishing their own literary and arts magazine, Ver Sacrum. They also published the work of many artists in the form of postcards.



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German-American Novelty Art Co.   (1905-1912)
New York, NY

Theodore Stroefer published illustrated landscape views and many other subjects in sets of four to twelve cards each that were numbered between 100 and the 900’s. Cards numbered above 1000 were reserved for their holiday and greeting postcards. Many of these cards were artist signed. All their cards were printed in Leipzig, Germany.



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German-American Post Card Mfg. Co.   (1906-1918)
318 Broadway, New York, NY

A publisher of hand colored and tinted halftone view-cards of the American northeast, especially southern New England.



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J. Gerstmayer   (1901-1933)
Vienna, Austria

An important printer of books and other lithographic materials including tinted halftone postcards. Many of their cards were of patriotic subjects, and they produced many battle scenes during World War One. Some are titled in Czech and Hungarian. The date of issuance always appears on these cards. Many of these cards were printed for the publisher Gustav Braun.



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Gibson Art Co.   1908-
Cincinatti, OH

A publisher of greeting cards. Many of their illustrations floated within the white paper field of the card, which was a distinctly American inovation in design. Gibson’s postcards were not numbered.



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Laurence T. Gieringer   1941-
Hamburg, PA

Laurence Gieringer and his brother Paul pursued their childhood dreams and spent the rest of their lives building Roadside America. This interactive roadside attraction was one of the largest miniature villages ever to be built, and many postcards were published depicting its many facets. When Laurence died in 1961 the Village became frozen in time. Though his recreation was meant to represent the true American landscape, it was more of a conception than an actual slice of life. These postcards are a prime example of what is termed roadside America apart from the name of the business.



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Gies & Co. Lithography   1875-1922
Buffalo, NY

Charles Gies had worked for various printing houses since the age of ten before starting his own business with George H. Dunston in 1852. This lithography firm grew to become one of the largest printers of fine chromolithographic products in the United States. They produced a wide variety of printed products that included prints, calendars, trade cards, postcards, and bound books as well. They printed the official cards for the 1901 Pan American Exposition in Buffalo for the Niagara Envelope Manufactory. As they grew the opened other offices around the country, and even solicited business from Europe. In 1884 Dunston left the company and and opened a competing firm.



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Giesen Brothers & Co.   (1902-1909)
28 Monkwell Street, London, England

This firm published many holiday and greeting cards in series as chromolithographs, but they are better known for their images of theater celebrities. Most of these actors and actresses were presented as real photo postcards manufactured by Rotophot in Berlin, though they also produced a poor quality set on rigid stock under the name Henry Giesen’s Panel Cards.



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Benjamin Arthur Gifford   1888-1927
Portland and Dalles, OR

Gifford began his career as a portrait studio photographer in Kansas before moving to Portland in 1890. There he became intrigued with the scenery and made it the new focus of his work after partnering with Herbert Hale in 1904 to form the Gifford & Hale Studio. This partnership dissolved after Gifford moved to The Dalles in 1897 to concentrate on producing photos of Native Americans and the Columbia River for railroad companies. Many of these images would be blown up to large proportions for use in railroad stations. He also published postcards from these images, and other publishers used them as well. In 1910 he sold his studio to Charles Lamb and moved back to Portland. Between 1917 and 1920 he partnered with the photographer Arthur M. Prentiss to form Gifford & Prentiss, Inc. They would buy up the negatives of the Kiser Photo Co. after they closed in 1918. The partnership was dissolved after Gifford retired in 1920. His son Ralph I. Gifford, who was also a photographer, continued to publish his fatherŐs work, sometimes under his own name until 1927 when he sold the family business. Afterwards Ralph continued on with his own studio until 1936.



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Le Gilletta & Cie   1880-
Nice, France

Jean Gilletta was a photographer that captured many images of southern France and northern Italy. Many of these scenes were printed as postcards in a variety of techniques. The company also published a number of tourist guidebooks, a tradition that continues to this day.



Colored Real Photo Postcard

G.L. Co.   (1903-1920’s)
Netherlands

A publisher known for their real photo postcards of children and women that were used as holiday and general greeting cards. Other cards depicted actresses and nudes. While most of their cards were lightly hand colored they also issued cards in black & white.



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G. Giovanardi   (1910-1912)
Sydney, Australia

This photographer had some of his work printed in Germany as tinted collotypes.



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Glacier Park Hotel Co.   1905-1961
St. Paul, MN

A wholly owned subsidiary of the Great Northern Railway Company formed to privately develop Glacier National Park for tourists. The Great Northern was a major transcontinental railway that skirted the southern border of the park. They had lobbied hard for its formation for they new it would increase rail traffic on their line. They did much to promote the park referring to the area as the American Alps and their rail line as the National Park Route. In 1915 they began the See America First campaign which produced a great many postcards in a number of different techniques. Well known photographers such as T.J. Hileman and F.H. Kiser were hired to provide images for postcard production. These promotional campaigns greatly reinforced national tourism and American mythology. The Glacier Park Hotel Company was sold to the National Park Service in 1961 and Great Northern merged into the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1970.



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Louis Glaser   (1881-1915)
Leipzig, Saxony

A printer of souvenir books and postcards. He is best known for the Glaser Process in which a rich monochrome image could be produced by using at least five different litho stones, not for different colors but for different tonalities. This process was shared with the printer Charles Frey of Frankfort, Germany. He produced many other postcards as tinted halftones.



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Herbert Glasier & Co.   (1910-1935)
7 Yarmouth Street, Boston, MA

A photographer who produced real photo postcards of national views for many different publishers. Many of these cards seem to have been contracted from establishments catering to tourists. A unique stamp box appears on the back of their cards that more likely serves the purpose of a logo than indicating the type of photo paper used.



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H.G. Glen & Co., Ltd.   (1899-)
Leeds, England

A publisher of postcards under the Glensco Series name. Their early cards were printed in tinted heliogravure in Saxony, and largely consisted of views and comic cards.



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M. Gluckstadt and Munden Co.   (1896-)
Hamburg, Germany

Operated a colonial goods shop. They were also a major printer and distributor of postcards with jobbers in many international ports. They used the lichtdruck process to print monochromatic cards as both full images and multi-views, many of which were latter hand colored. They produced view-cards of Europe, Palestine, and of Germany’s colonies, often as Gruss aus cards.



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Paul Goerke & Son   (1890’s-1907)
Manitou, Colorado

Photographers who bought a large track of land soon after moving to Manitou full of highly eroded rock formations known as Mushroom Park. This area near Silver Springs was already popular with tourists and they constructed roads and trails through their property to encourage visitors. They did not charge admission to walk or ride through this unique landscape but the Goerkes reserved all rights to take photographs there. These practices lead to the production of many real photo postcards depicting visitors posing before large rock formations.



Goeggel & Weidner   1903

See Charles Weidner



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Emil Goetz   1896-1958
Luzern, Switzerland

A photographer and publisher of finely tinted collotype view-cards. During the First World War they produced a set of feildpostcards depicting scenes from the front.



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Gonzalez Padin Co.   (1915-1995)
San Juan, PR

This department store chain published tinted halftone postcards of greetings and views in their early years. Some of their cards were sold in booklet form.



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Gottschalk, Dreyfuss & Davis   (1909-1915)
45 East 20th Street, New York, NY

Published Illustrated booklets and both holiday and greeting cards. Many of the mottos used for these cards were directly solicited from the public. These hand collored collotypes were printed in Germany. They also had offices in London and Munich.



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Le Goubey   (1920’s)
Normandy, France

A photographer who published regional view-cards from his own work in monochromatic rotogravure.



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W. N. Gough   (1906-1938)
York, ME

Published view-cards of the York area of southern Maine using a variety of printers.



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Goupil & Cie    1850-1884
Paris, France

After his involvement in various business arrangements, Adolphe Goupil along with six partners formed Goupil & Company, which became the premiere print dealer in France. They would soon open offices in New York, The Hague, Brussels, London, Berlin, Vienna, and eventually in Australia. Their New York representative, Michel Knoedler bought out their office to set up Knoedler & Company. By 1869 they set up their own printing facilities in Ashieres under the direction of Henri Rousselon. In 1872 he would develop a unique process for the firm known as Goupilgravure. This also marked the firms entry into photomechanical reproduction. As the Goupil family died out the remaining partners took over in 1884 and they became known as Boussod, Valadon & Company. In 1897 they became exclusively involved with printing but they formed a subsidiary, Manzi, Joyant & Company to deal with the fine art publishing end of the business. This new firm closed two years after Manzi died in 1915, and the remainder of the business closed in 1919. While they did not produce postcards outright, they licensed out images to other publishers since the time of trade cards.



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J. Gouttefangens   (1906-1938)
Olliergues, France

Published postcards of local views and buildings in monotone and tinted collotype. Many of these color view-cards have a very distinct look.



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Gowen Sutton Co. Ltd.   1921-1960
Vancouver, BC Canada

A publisher of real photo and printed postcards of the Canadian West. Not only did they produce cards depicting large cities, they captued many hard to reach views within the Canadian Territories. Many of their cards were hand tinted in a simple manner striving for style rather than realism, which created cards in vastly differing quality. While the real photo cards were made in Canada their printed cards were made in England.



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Granbergs Konstindustri Aktiebolags   1896-
Stockholm, Sweden and Berlin, Germany

Founded as Linkoping by Hasse W. Tulburg in 1890, they became Granbergs in 1896; a major publisher of lithographic materials. They were an early pioneer of artist signed postcards and view-cards of Scandinavia, and up until 1917 of the Baltics, Russia, and Central Asia through tricolor printing and photo-chromolithography.



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Grand Trunk Railway Co. of Canada   1852-1919
London. England

The main lines of this railroad company connected the New England States with the Provence of Quebec and Ontario. Although headquartered in London the Railroad was functionally run out of Montreal in Canada. They contracted out a number of postcards depicting views along their routes with small local publishers. Despite expanding their lines to new destination they went bankrupt and were incorporated into the Canadian National Railways in 1920.



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J. Granet   (1899-1904)
Mexico City, Mexico

A publisher of postcards in tinted collotype depicting types and views of Mexico.



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Paul Grasnick   1899-1943
Berlin, Germany

Grasnick had a brief partnership with Ernst Horstmeyer in 1896 as a contract printer of chromolithographs, but he soon left to work for the firm of J. Miesler. In 1898 he left Miesler to become a partner of Paul Finkenrath, but this partnership also soon dissolved when he left to establish his own shop in 1899. He became a printer of chromolithographic labels, posters, and postcards; and may have even printed postcards for Finkenrath. Nothing is known of Grasnick after 1921, so he may have died that year; but the business continued to operate until 1943 when the factory was destroyed in an air raid during World War Two. An offset printer with the same name reappeared in the 1950’s but its relationship to the earlier firm remains unclear.



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Fritz Gratl   (1898-1910)
Innsbruck, Austria

A photographer who produced regional views, many of which were turned into printed and real photo postcards. He also produced propaganda cards and illustrated books.



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George S. Graves   1908-1914
Springfield, MA and Harpswell, ME

Published black & white view-cards that were base on his photographs of Springfield, Massachusetts and the Maine coast. They were printed line block utilizing an open halftone, and sometimes hand colored. Graves published approximately 650 views of Maine between Portland and Boothbay Harbor. While some cards have his name printed on them as publisher, others only have his name on the image as a photo credit.



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Merrill H. Graves   (1890-1906)
111 Washington St., Marblehead, MA

A photographer and stationer. Graves produced early local stereo-views and photographs, many of which were turned into printed black & white and hand colored collotype postcards. He also produced line block cards in halftone on textured paper.



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Gray News Co.   (1906-1922)
Salt Lake City, UT

A publisher and distributor of regional view-cards. Many images were produced of sparsely populated rugged areas.



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Great Western Post Card Co.   (1908-1970)
Denver, CO

A publisher of roadside postcards and views depicting Colorado scenes. Their output ranged from early tinted halftones to modern photochromes.



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E.R. Green & Co.   (1905-1907)
Victoria Street, Blackpool, England

This firm founded by Edward Rhodes Green largely published comic cards under the Victoria Series name. These tinted halftone cards were printed in Saxony. He was the first to publish artist signed cards by Teddy Ashton.



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Green Mountain Card Co.   (1906-1945)
White River Junction, VT

Published sets of color and black & white view-cards capturing scenes from Vermont to New Hampshire. Some of their cards were hand colored.



Real Photo Postcard

John Worthington Gregory   1920’s-1992
Hyannis, MA

A noted artist and photographer of eastern Massachusetts. He is best known for his lithographs and photographs of Provincetown on Cape Cod. Both his drawn and photographic work were turned into real photo postcards. Many of his cards are titled and signed in hand. The bulk of his work seems to date from the 1930’s. Many of his photo images were later reproduced in halftone lithography on continental size cards.



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E. A. Grimm   (1897-)
Hamburg, Germany

An early printer of view-cards. They contracted out cards to American publishers and are noted for a pioneer set of 12 views depicting Philadelphia. Their cards were distributed through a worldwide system.



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Grimm & Kern   (1917-1928)
Valparaiso, Chile

Publishers of sheet music, books and postcards in hand colored photogravure.



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W. J. Grimshaw   (1912-1928)
Staten Island, NY

A photographer who published printed view-cards of Staten Island based on his own photos. With the exception of some hand colored cards most of his views were printed in black & white through the Albertype Company.



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Grogan Photo System, Inc.   (1918-1950)
322 Read Street, Milwaukee, WI

Walter Raymond Grogan had been a salesman south of the border before opening up his own printshop in Mexico City. After Revolution broke out in Mexico he moved to San Francisco 1n 1912 where he began to manufacture photo paper. Seeing the tremendous need for photographs in the growing printing trades he opened a stock photo house after moving to Wisconsin in 1918 that provided images for publication. Grogan also published real photo postcards on his own utilizing his vast inventory. During WWII non-military views and types from the Pacific were used to create postcards aimed at servicemen fighting in that theater. Eventually he opened branches in Chicago, Minneapolis, and Philadelphia, and changed the company’s name to Grogan Photo Service.



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Edward Gross   (1908-1951)
118 East 16th Street, New York, NY

A publisher and important distributor of prints and postcards. Many of their cards were comics or artist signed by notables such as C.H. Twelvetrees and Rose O’Neill, and they were produced in a variety of manner. They were often issued in serries.



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H. Guggenheim & Co.   1893-1945
Zurich, Switzerland

A major early Swiss postcard publisher, founded in 1893 by lithographer Hermann Guggenheim. He produced a great variety of view-cards depicting Switzerland as well as other European countries. While their earliest cards were printed in lithography, they expanded into collotype relying mostly on German printers until World War One. After the death of Hermann in 1912, his two younger brothers, Marcus and Emil took over the business, deleting the H. from the company name. As printing technology evolved, they adjusted their production to include real photo cards. The company closed down in 1945.



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Gulfport Printing Co.   1920’s-
Gulfport, MS

A printer and publisher of regional view-cards and other materials. Their images have a soft pale look due to the open halftone employed.



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Gulf Stream Card and Distribution Co.   (1940’s-)
7801 NW 52nd Street, Miami, FL

A distributor of view-cards depicting scenes from the American South.



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Gut & Steers   (1913-1917)
New York, NY

A publisher and distributor of fine lithographic white border view-cards. Many of their cards were distributed though Union News. Their cards often utilize the same type and style of technical process logos on their backs, such as Photochrome or Polychrome, that were used earlier by the American News Company.


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Gyger & Klopfenstein   1930-1951
Adelboden, Switzerland

Emanuel Gyger began his career as a teacher of the pastry arts, but by 1909 he became interested in photography and opened a photo supply shop with with his brother-in-law Hermann Eggimann. Gyger was an avid climber of the Alps and with his guide and aprentice, Arnold Klopfenstein he produced photographs that highly influenced the aesthetics of the region. After Eggimand died in 1930, Klopfenstein became his new partner. They published many fine Swiss printed postcards in color gravure of Alpine views and plants. These cards on textured paper are very matt but tend to be bright in appearance.

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As with other photo studios Gyger & Klopfenstein had other photographers as well as family members working for them. Thor E. Gyger produced many local views of the Alps, some specific to location but many generic views as well. He is also noted for a very large set of flower postcards. Many of his images were published under his own name.




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