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Nantuckrome
Nantuckrome is the trade name for postcards published by Marshall Gardiner and printed by the Photochrome Process Company depicting scenes of Nantucket Island. These cards printed after 1935 reproduced many scenes that were printed earlier by the Detroit Publishing Company but they were of lower quality.

National Postcard Week
National Postcard Week is the first full week in May set aside by Congress in 1984 to commemorate and publicize postcard collecting. During this time collectors and postcard clubs often publish and release their own postcards to mark this event. It is celebrated simultaneously in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

National Tourism
National tourism refers to travel as a marketed commodity, stressing the notion of national unity reinforced by shared experiences. This form of tourism helps to create national mythologies through the careful selection and promotion of tourist sites that accentuate a particular set of ideals while ignoring inconvenient historical elements. Postcards have played a significant role in promoting these ideals.

Natural Color
Natural color is a term used in printing to differentiate the colors captured through photography as opposed to those chosen by retouchers in a printing house or drawn by an artist. When color postcards were first published the imagery on them was either hand drawn or retouched from black & white photographs. At the same time some early photographers experimented with panchromatic film prior to its commercial release in 1906, and through the use of filters and specially made cameras that exposed multiple negatives they were able to separate out different colors of the spectrum within the same scene. Without the availability of a stable color photo paper these images were often projected back through colored filters in lantern shows to create color images, but they could also be used to create multiple printing plates for color printing. A number of such techniques were developed over the years but all were difficult to use and not commercially viable until the release of Kodachrome in 1935 that allowed for easy mechanical color separation in printing. Various publishers since the turn of the 20th century, including those who first printed photochrome postcards sometimes added the words natural color to their cards as a swlling point. As modern photochromes began to look more realistic and monopolized the postcard market the need to use this term died out.

Newvochrome
Newvochrome is a trade name for postcards distributed by the American News Company that were printed in black collotype over broadly applied red, yellow, and blue lithography. These cards printed on paper with a light embossed pattern are characterized by a sharp look and a dull finish. They were promoted as the best made of all German cards.

Novelty Cards
Any postcard created with features beyond a standard postal size or containing a simple picture can be considered a novelty card. Many novelties were printed on unusual substances such as wood or leather, and were die cut into strange shapes or puzzles. Metallic powders, silk embroidery, coins, feathers, hair, and many other items were often added to them. Many have moveable parts and some actually make sounds. These cards were usually mailed in envelopes for protection of both the card and the mail handler. Many forms of novelties have their origins in the 19th century when they were produced as advertising for products or businesses and just for simple amusement.


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