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Postcard

Otto Ubbelohde   1876-1922
German, b. Marburg, Saxony

After his studies at the Munich Academy, Ubbelohde became known for his landscape work in painting and etching. He produced much work for calendars, posters, and postcards, but became best known for his illustrations of the Brothers Grimm. Though influenced by Jugendstil his work largely remains neo-impressionistic in temperament. His postcards were drawn in a linear style and reproduced in black & white.



Postcard

Clarence Frederick Underwood   1871-1929
American, b. Jamestown, New York

Underwood studied at the Art Students League in New York and at the Julian Art Academy in Paris. He became a painter and illustrator of romance and glamour themes in a fairly academic style. Many of these images of upper class women wound up on leading magazine covers such as Century, Studio, McClure’s Harper’s and The Saturday Evening Post. During World War One he began producing patriotic images for posters. Underwood was a popular artist and much of his work was reproduced on postcards.



Postcard

Luiz Felipe Usabal Hernandez   1876-1937
Spanish

Usabal was a painter who seemed to have work in Valencia. He also illustrated a number of film posters and glamour postcards that sometimes leaned toward the risqué. During World War One he provided a number of illustrations for postcards, many of which were used by German publishers.



Postcard

Marina Uspenskaya   1925-2007
Russian, b. Moscow

As the granddaughter of artist V.I. Navozov, Uspenkaya also sought a career in the arts. She first studied theatre and decorative arts at the Art College in Moscow, going on to study graphic design at the Surikove Institute. Afterwards she became a very popular book designer and illustrator producing over 200 children’s books for publishers worldwide. Many of her illustrations were also published as postcards. Though her early work was fairly realistic, her style grew more expressive by the late-1960’s, and began to incorporate symbolist elements.




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