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Arthur Paetzold   1870-1920
German, b. Altona

Paetzold was an impressionist landscape painter who began designing chromolithographic postcards in the 1890’s. His cards have a much more graphic quality from there use of flat colors.



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Ethel Parkinson   1868-1957
British

Parkinson was an illustrator who placed many of her images of children and women onto postcards. Much of her imagery revolved around playful Dutch themes.



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Augustin Patcher   1863-1926
Bavarian, b. Munich

Between 1879 and 1884 Patcher attended the School of Applied art in Munich. Afterwards he primarily worked as a stained glass artist, though he did create similar styled graphics for bookplates and postcards.



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Nikolai Pavlov   1899-1968
Russian

Pavlov was a graphic artist working out of Leningrad who produced posters and postcards. He made many drawings of the city while under siege during World War Two, which were placed on postcards in later years.



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Henry Joseph Payne   1858-1927
British, b. Newington, London

Harry Payne studied at the Birmingham School of Art, at which he later taught. While he worked as a portrait painter, he became known for his contemporary and historical military depictions often made in collaboration with his brother Arthur. They began turning out chromolithographic military prints during the 1880’s, and about the same time Harry found work designing Christmas cards for Raphael Tuck. He would go on to illustrate postcards for them and Gale & Polden between 1900 and 1921. While most of his illustrations depicted military subjects, he also produced scenes of rural life for other postcard publishers, and he designed scrap for Birns Brothers. Magazines such as Strand and Army & Navy Illustrated also used his work.



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Thomas Hutchinson Peddie   1871-1954
Scott, b. Scone

Tom Peddie was an illustrator and cartoonist who primarily worked in watercolor. After moving to London in the 1890Ős, he began to produce work for the Strand, Punch, Quiver, and the Red Magazine. Many of these images were also used to illustrate postcards.



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Carlo Pellegrini    1866-1937
Italian, b. Como

Pellegrini was a prolific illustrator who mostly worked in Switzerland. He produced many posters and about 450 postcards depicting winter sports in the Alps. He should not be confused with the caricaturist for Vanity Fair by the same name.



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Erwin Pendl   1875-1945
Austrian, b. Vienna

Pendl was a painter and sculpture who worked in an academic style. Many of his watercolors depicting architecture were used on postcards.



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Edward Penfield   1866-1925
American, b. Brooklyn, NY

As a boy, Edward admired his uncle Henry Lewis Penfield, who was an artist and engraver, and decided to pursue art as a career. In 1889 he enrolled in the Art Students League, and in 1891 he had his first work published as a staff illustrator for Harper’s Weekly. By 1893 he had become the magazine’s Art Director. That same year he began designing posters. After marrying he moved to the Bronx in 1897 but moved again soon after to Pelham Manor. In 1901 he became a member of the Society of Illustrators, and would later serve as the group’s President in 1921. His ink and watercolor drawings had become more simplified over the years as he embraced modernist tendencies. His style was not only popular, it was very well suited for graphic work. While best known for his drawings at Harper’s, Penfield also created many other illustrations for Collier’s, Ladies’ Home Journal, Life, Metropolitan Magazine, The Saturday Evening Post, and Scribner’s. In addition he provided illustrations for calendars and ads, many of which were used on advertising postcards. When he retired from magazine work he had more time to travel, an in 1907 he penned his first book Holland Sketches followed by Spanish Sketches four years later. In 1924 he was badly injured in a fall and died the following year. He had a tremendous influence on commercial art in the United States.



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Roger Tory Peterson   1908-1996
American, b. Jamestown, New York

Peterson had worked as a furniture painter but the interest he had in birds since a member of the Junior Audobon Club eventually propelled him to New York City in 1927 to study at the Art Students League. After further studies at the National Academy of design he moved to Brookline, Massachusetts in 1931. As a strong proponent of natural history, Peterson began to write and illustrate the first if his 53 field guides to birds in 1934. These books quickly became very popular and by 1939 he illustrated a large postcard set depicting birds for the National Wildlife Publishing Corp.



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Adolfine Valerie Petter   1881-1963
Austrian, b. Vienna

After studying painting at the Hohenberger School, Petter studied at the Vienna School of Applied Arts between 1904 and 1907. She primarily worked as a decorative and graphic artist, often utilizing woodcut. She provided illustrations for Erdgeist, Muskete, Die Flache, and The International Studio, plus one postcard for the Wiener Werkstätte. She is also known for her embroidery and wallpaper designs.



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Friedrich Michael Pfeifer   1882-1956
Austrian

Pfeifer was a painter and illustrator who worked in Vienna. He designed a number of postcards.



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Robert Philippi   1877-1959
Austrian, b. Graz

Philippi was a widely exhibited painter and printmaker who studied art in Graz. He opened his studio in Vienna where he showed with the Secession. He produced a great deal of graphic art including illustrated postcards and holiday cards. Though is early work displays the influence of Art Nouveau, he had come under the influence of Expressionism by 1915. In 1922 he began showing with Der Hagenbund.



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Reginald Phillimore Phillimore   1855-1941
British, b. near Manchester

Phillimore was a painter and etcher, exhibiting his first work in 1873. He would eventually show at the Royal Academy in London, and the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh. He also worked as a teacher, but after moving to the resort town of North Berwic he devoted his time to painting. He continued to travel throughout England and Scotland, but most of his work centered around the coast near his home. About 700 of his sketches were turned into collotype postcards, many of which were hand colored by a girl from his neighborhood. Much of his work is mannered, having a somewhat primitive quality. His cards usually have prominent long descriptions pertaining to the scene’s location.



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Clarence Coles Phillips   1880-1927
American, b. Springfield, Ohio

Phillips, who first worked as a clerk left for New York in 1904 after graduating from Kenyon Collage. There he set up his own advertising agency before moving to New Rochelle in 1905. By 1908 he produced his first cover for Life magazine, and he would join their staff eight years latter. Other magazines such as Good Housekeeping, Colliers, Saturday Evening Post, McCall’s, Woman’s Home Companion, and Vogue would also reproduce his work. He also worked on numerous advertising campaigns with his watercolors for Willy’s Overland perhaps the best known. By 1911 he dropped Clarence from his name and called himself just plain Coles. His strong use of negative space gave his work a distinct look. The abstract nature of these designs put it into close association with Art Deco, but its spirit lay more in the Arts and Crafts movement. His model, Teresa Hyde, who he would latter marry became known as the Fadeaway Girl. In the 1920’s he added a more risqué touch to his figures, which sometimes stirred controversy. In 1924 Phillips contracted Tuberculosis, which would eventually kill him.



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Anton Franciscus Pieck   1895-1987
Dutch, b. Den Helder

Pieck was a painter, printmaker, and illustrator who produced most of his work after retiring from teaching high school in 1960 after 48 years of service. His work was used for calendars, travel books, and children’s classics, most notably the Arabian Nights. Pieck did not design postcards but his illustrations in watercolor were placed on countless cards due to their popularity. His complex imagery displays the influence of Japanese prints and pre World War One romantic illustration, making them seem much older than they actually are. Between 1952 and 1974 he designed the fairytale park Efteling, which brought him wide recognition. Since the Pieck Museum opened in 1984 even more of his illustrations have been placed on cards as reproductions. Pieck’s brother, Henri Christiaan was a Soviet spy who also worked as an artist.



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Heinz Pinggera   1900-?
Austrian

Pinggera was a painter and illustrator who provided images for postcards. During World War One he produced anti-Italian propaganda. While primarily an academic landscape artist, he showed some interest in Orientalism.



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Karl Pippich   1862-1932
Austrian, b. Vienna

Pippich, who studied at the Vienna Academy, worked primarily as a landscape artist. Intrigued with the changes the turn of the century brought, he spent much of his time capturing modern street life of Vienna in oils and watercolor. He was also interested in military subjects and would paint images of the army while out on maneuver. He continued to produce military paintings during the Great War, though many of these have more patriotic overtones. Many of his pictures were placed on postcards.



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Ernst Platz   1867-1940
German, b Karlsruhe

Platz, a member of the German and Austrian Alpine Club had a great passion for mountain climbing. His mountaineering experiences inspired him to abandon his ambition to become an architect after three years of study, in favor of becoming an artist. After some private studies in painting, he attended the Academy in Karlsruhe. He spent many years traveling, climbing, and turning his adventures into works of art. In 1898 he traveled to the German Colony of Tanganika to climb and sketch Mount Kilimanjaro. Though he was also trained as a geologist, his compositions usually focused on a human narrative in order to increase their salability. He produced much graphic work at the same time providing illustrations for books, posters, and fine chromolithographic postcards. Impoverished after World War One, he managed to continued working but could never afford to realize his dream to climb in the Himalayas.



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Dr. Georg Plischke   1883-1973
Prussian, b. Neisse

Plischke studied at the Universities in Breslau and Greifswald, earning a doctorate in philosophy in 1909. By 1912 he had become obsessed with paper cutting but this calling was interrupted by his service as an artilleryman in World War One. After the war he moved to Zittau where he began work as a graphic designer. In 1924 much of his output was printed as elaborate lithographic silhouettes on postcards. By 1934 he had opened an art publishing company under his own name. He was forced to relocate to upper Bavaria during the Second World War, but in 1949 the firm moved to Unterwassen where it is currently located.



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Alexander Popini   1878-1962
Hungarian, b. Bucharest

Popini primarily worked as an illustrator creating historical and fashion images for magazines and advertising. He moved to New York City in 1911.



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Margaret Evans Price   1888-1973
American, b. Chicago

Margaret Evans spent most of her childhood in Nova Scotia before moving to Massachusetts to attend the state normal art school. She then left for Paris but returned in 1897, selling her first illustration to the Boston Journal in 1900. She went on to study at the Boston Academy. By 1908 she was supplying illustrations to Harper & Brothers, Native Magazine, Woman’s Home Companion, and Pictorial Review, which was followed by illustrations for novels and children’s books. In 1909 she married Irving Price, and in 1920 they moved to East Aurora in western New York. They both came from wealth families and would make their presence felt. Irving would become the town’s mayor while Margaret painted murals for the Aurora Theatre. In 1930 Irving partnered with Herman Fisher to start the Fisher-Price Toy Company. Margaret became their art director and many of their early toys were based on her children’s book characters. She continued working as an illustrator, having purchased the former home of President Millard Fillmore to use as a studio. After the couple purchased a second home in Bermuda, the time she spent there inspired changes in her style. Many of her illustrations were also published as postcards.



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Karl Ludwig Prinz   1875-1944
Austrian, b. Vienna

Prinz was a painter of the Austrian and Italian landscape whose work was placed on postcards. He also designed sets for many international theaters including those in New York City.



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Alfredo Protti   1882-1949
Italian, b. Bologna?

Protti was primarily a portrait and figurative painter working in a somewhat impressionist style. While most of his paintings were fairly ordinary, some can be considered risqué. He exhibited extensively, and took part in the Roman Secession. In 1910 Protti traveled to Buenos Ares, which was the first of many trips abroad that included the United States. Many of his images were used to illustrate postcards.




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