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Postcard

Jean Effel   1908-1982
French, b. Paris

Francois Lejeune’s father wanted him to continue in the family business but he turned to a career in the arts. After a not so successful stint as a playwright, he changed his name to Jean Effel and began working as a painter, illustrator, and journalist. He is best known for his anti-fascist caricatures produced in the late 1930’s, and for his five volume The Creation of the World begun in 1945. Many of his cartoons found there way onto postcards. Effel received the Lenin Peace Prize in 1967.



Postcard

Anton Eichinger   1880-Unknown
Austrian, b. Vienna

Eichinger studied at the Vienna School of Applied Arts between 1904 and 1908. Afterwards he worked as a commercial artist in graphic arts and design, and later taught at the technical school in Starkstadt. In 1908 he produced four postcards for the Wiener Werkstätte in a playful graphic style.



Postcard

Hellmuth Eichrodt   1872-1943
German, b. Bruchsal

Between 1890 and 1903 Eichrodt studied at the Academy in Karlsruhe. He worked as a graphic artist, illustrator, ceramist, and painter. While he painted murals for churches and the mausoleum of Emperor Menetik II in Addis Ababa, he is just as well known for his Art Nouveau posters, poster stamps, and postcards which he began to design in 1898. He also created fairy tale book and magazine illustrations, contributing to Simplicissimus and Jugend for which he worked between 1897 and 1912.



Postcard

Harry Eliott   1882-1959
French, b. Paris

Charles Edmund Hermet largely worked as an illustrator producing pictures for La Chasscur Francais. It is generally believed that he change his name to Harry Eliott to help him gain access to the British art market. Many of his watercolors were used to illustrate postcards.



Postcard

Rachael Robinson Elmer   1878-1919
American, b. Ferrisburgh, Vermont

Elmer’s family encouraged her to begin studying art at the age of twelve. By 1886 she was already providing illustrations for children’s books and magazines. Between 1898 and 1901 she furthered her studies by attending the Art Students League in New York City, eventually settling there after 1904. In 1914 Elmer produced her best known work, which was a set of twelve cityscapes of New York published on postcards as part of P.F. Volland’s Art Lovers Series. She later self published a set of six woodblock reproductions as postcards capturing New York City scenes in a more modernist style for the Association of Woman Painters, Artists & Sculptures biennial celebration in 1916. While serving as a volunteer nurse during World War One, Elmer contracted influenza in the great outbreak from which she died.



Postcard

Joseph Engelhardt   1880-1910
Bavarian, b. Munich

Engelhardt was a painter of somewhat traditional landscapes, but his design work as used on postcards was imbued with a much more personal graphic style.



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Delphin Enjorlas   1857 - 1945
French, b. Courcouron

Enjorlas received a very academic training from the Beaux-Arts under the tutelage of such notables as Gerome and Dagnan-Bouveret. While he started out as a landscape artist he soon became more interested in depictions of women, which he rendered in paint and pastel. These depictions range from women engaged in ordinary domestic life to full nudes, but usually all with some sort of dramatic lighting effects. He began exhibiting in the Paris Salon in 1890 and by 1901 he had joined the Societe des Artites Francais. His images had strong appeal amongst the public and were reproduced on many postcards.



Postcard

Louie Ewing   1908-1983
1908-1983

After studying art in California, Ewing moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1935 where he intended to open a school. It failed after a short time in the hard economic times, and he eventually found work with the WPA. A number of his landscapes would be placed on postcards by local establishments.




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